Quantifying the Effects of Forest Canopy Cover on Net Snow Accumulation at a Continental, Mid-Latitude Site, Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM, USA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193352
Title:
Quantifying the Effects of Forest Canopy Cover on Net Snow Accumulation at a Continental, Mid-Latitude Site, Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM, USA
Author:
Veatch, William Curtis
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although forest properties are known to influence snowpack accumulation and spring runoff, the processes underlying the impacts of forest canopy cover on the input of snowmelt to the catchment remain poorly characterized. In this study I show that throughfall and canopy shading can combine to result in maximal snowpacks in forests of moderate canopy density. Snow depth and density data taken shortly before spring melt in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico show strong correlation between forest canopy density and snow water equivalent, with maximal snow accumulation in forests with density between 25 and 45%. Forest edges are also shown to be highly influential on local snow depth variability, with shaded open areas holding significantly deeper snow than either unshaded open or deep forest areas. These results are broadly applicable in improving estimates of water resource availability, predicting the ecohydrological implications of vegetation change, and informing integrated water resources management.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
snow accumulation; forest - snow interactions; binary regression tree model; spatial distribution; forest density
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brooks, Paul D.
Committee Chair:
Brooks, Paul D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleQuantifying the Effects of Forest Canopy Cover on Net Snow Accumulation at a Continental, Mid-Latitude Site, Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM, USAen_US
dc.creatorVeatch, William Curtisen_US
dc.contributor.authorVeatch, William Curtisen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough forest properties are known to influence snowpack accumulation and spring runoff, the processes underlying the impacts of forest canopy cover on the input of snowmelt to the catchment remain poorly characterized. In this study I show that throughfall and canopy shading can combine to result in maximal snowpacks in forests of moderate canopy density. Snow depth and density data taken shortly before spring melt in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico show strong correlation between forest canopy density and snow water equivalent, with maximal snow accumulation in forests with density between 25 and 45%. Forest edges are also shown to be highly influential on local snow depth variability, with shaded open areas holding significantly deeper snow than either unshaded open or deep forest areas. These results are broadly applicable in improving estimates of water resource availability, predicting the ecohydrological implications of vegetation change, and informing integrated water resources management.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectsnow accumulationen_US
dc.subjectforest - snow interactionsen_US
dc.subjectbinary regression tree modelen_US
dc.subjectspatial distributionen_US
dc.subjectforest densityen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrooks, Paul D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairBrooks, Paul D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2799en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749851en_US
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