Chirping Like the Swallows: Aristophanes' Portrayals of the Barbarian "Other"

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193343
Title:
Chirping Like the Swallows: Aristophanes' Portrayals of the Barbarian "Other"
Author:
Bravo, Christopher Delante
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this thesis, I examine three specific characters from the extant plays of Aristophanes: the Scythian archer from Thesmophoriazusae, the Thracian god from Birds, and the Persian King's Eye from Acharnians. Through a close analysis of these three characters, I show that Aristophanes portrayed each one in a different manner and with varying degrees of hostility. Aristophanes' portrayals of these foreigners were likely informed by his fellow Athenians' attitudes toward non-Athenians. As I demonstrate, the interactions of foreigners with Greek characters in Aristophanes' plays reveal subtle gradations of Greek xenophobia. The playwright composed his comedies in a period of great cultural change and increasingly diverse perceptions of non-Greeks, and as a result, these xenophobic nuances emerged. Views of barbarians were evolving in the last quarter of the fifth century BCE, and Greek xenophobia was not a monolithic social phenomenon.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Acharnians; Aristophanes; Barbarian; Birds; Other; Thesmophoriazusae
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Classics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bauschatz, John
Committee Chair:
Bauschatz, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleChirping Like the Swallows: Aristophanes' Portrayals of the Barbarian "Other"en_US
dc.creatorBravo, Christopher Delanteen_US
dc.contributor.authorBravo, Christopher Delanteen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis, I examine three specific characters from the extant plays of Aristophanes: the Scythian archer from Thesmophoriazusae, the Thracian god from Birds, and the Persian King's Eye from Acharnians. Through a close analysis of these three characters, I show that Aristophanes portrayed each one in a different manner and with varying degrees of hostility. Aristophanes' portrayals of these foreigners were likely informed by his fellow Athenians' attitudes toward non-Athenians. As I demonstrate, the interactions of foreigners with Greek characters in Aristophanes' plays reveal subtle gradations of Greek xenophobia. The playwright composed his comedies in a period of great cultural change and increasingly diverse perceptions of non-Greeks, and as a result, these xenophobic nuances emerged. Views of barbarians were evolving in the last quarter of the fifth century BCE, and Greek xenophobia was not a monolithic social phenomenon.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectAcharniansen_US
dc.subjectAristophanesen_US
dc.subjectBarbarianen_US
dc.subjectBirdsen_US
dc.subjectOtheren_US
dc.subjectThesmophoriazusaeen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineClassicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBauschatz, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.chairBauschatz, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberVan Steen, Gondaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristenson, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest10403en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752145en_US
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