THE ARIZONA WATER-ENERGY NEXUS: ELECTRICITY FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER SERVICES

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193342
Title:
THE ARIZONA WATER-ENERGY NEXUS: ELECTRICITY FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER SERVICES
Author:
Hoover, Joseph Hamilton
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The water-energy nexus is the dependent relationship between water and energy resources. The nexus results in complex policy and management challenges for resources that have been historically managed independently. This study quantifies electricity used for water service provision in Arizona. Employing the water use cycle as an analysis tool, this study divides municipal water use for the Tucson metropolitan area and city of Phoenix into four components. The findings suggest that energy intensity differences between Phoenix and Tucson exists due to geographic variables. The city of Phoenix and Tucson metropolitan area currently consume 1.2% of statewide electricity for water and wastewater service. Electricity demand for water and wastewater service in Tucson for 2008-2030 will be 110-131%, which is greater than the 85% electricity growth statewide. Water and wastewater agencies now face decisions regarding future plans to meet water demand and maintain a low overall energy use for service provision.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Arizona; Energy; Nexus; Water
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Scott, Christopher A.
Committee Chair:
Scott, Christopher A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTHE ARIZONA WATER-ENERGY NEXUS: ELECTRICITY FOR WATER AND WASTEWATER SERVICESen_US
dc.creatorHoover, Joseph Hamiltonen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoover, Joseph Hamiltonen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe water-energy nexus is the dependent relationship between water and energy resources. The nexus results in complex policy and management challenges for resources that have been historically managed independently. This study quantifies electricity used for water service provision in Arizona. Employing the water use cycle as an analysis tool, this study divides municipal water use for the Tucson metropolitan area and city of Phoenix into four components. The findings suggest that energy intensity differences between Phoenix and Tucson exists due to geographic variables. The city of Phoenix and Tucson metropolitan area currently consume 1.2% of statewide electricity for water and wastewater service. Electricity demand for water and wastewater service in Tucson for 2008-2030 will be 110-131%, which is greater than the 85% electricity growth statewide. Water and wastewater agencies now face decisions regarding future plans to meet water demand and maintain a low overall energy use for service provision.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectEnergyen_US
dc.subjectNexusen_US
dc.subjectWateren_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorScott, Christopher A.en_US
dc.contributor.chairScott, Christopher A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberComrie, Andrew C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, Katharine L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10460en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752170en_US
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