Reproductive Biomarkers to Identify Endocrine Disruption in a Native Endangered Fish, Bonytail Chub (Gila elegans), Exposed to Treated Effluent

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193337
Title:
Reproductive Biomarkers to Identify Endocrine Disruption in a Native Endangered Fish, Bonytail Chub (Gila elegans), Exposed to Treated Effluent
Author:
Paretti, Nick
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
We exposed a native endangered species, bonytail chub (Gila elegans), to graded concentrations of secondarily-treated effluent. At the end of each treatment period, we collected water from all raceways and samples were analyzed for the presence of 83 organic wastewater compounds. We extracted blood plasma from control and treatment fish in each raceway and samples were analyzed for hormones, 17β-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone, and the egg yolk protein, vitellogenin.17β-estradiol concentrations were consistently lower in treatment females than those detected in control females. The 17β-estradiol and vitellogenin concentrations were always higher in treatment males than those found in control males. Concentrations of 11-ketotestosterone were consistently lower in treatment males than those detected in control males.Endocrine disrupting effects occurred in male and female fish exposed to low concentrations of effluent. Changes in hormone levels suggested a feminizing effect in treatment male fish and an androgenizing effect in treatment female fish.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Endocrine disruption; Biomarkers; Effluent; Sex steroid hormones; Bonytail chub; Organic wastewater compounds
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Walker, David B; Matter, William J.
Committee Chair:
Walker, David B; Matter, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleReproductive Biomarkers to Identify Endocrine Disruption in a Native Endangered Fish, Bonytail Chub (Gila elegans), Exposed to Treated Effluenten_US
dc.creatorParetti, Nicken_US
dc.contributor.authorParetti, Nicken_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe exposed a native endangered species, bonytail chub (Gila elegans), to graded concentrations of secondarily-treated effluent. At the end of each treatment period, we collected water from all raceways and samples were analyzed for the presence of 83 organic wastewater compounds. We extracted blood plasma from control and treatment fish in each raceway and samples were analyzed for hormones, 17β-estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone, and the egg yolk protein, vitellogenin.17β-estradiol concentrations were consistently lower in treatment females than those detected in control females. The 17β-estradiol and vitellogenin concentrations were always higher in treatment males than those found in control males. Concentrations of 11-ketotestosterone were consistently lower in treatment males than those detected in control males.Endocrine disrupting effects occurred in male and female fish exposed to low concentrations of effluent. Changes in hormone levels suggested a feminizing effect in treatment male fish and an androgenizing effect in treatment female fish.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectEndocrine disruptionen_US
dc.subjectBiomarkersen_US
dc.subjectEffluenten_US
dc.subjectSex steroid hormonesen_US
dc.subjectBonytail chuben_US
dc.subjectOrganic wastewater compoundsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWalker, David Ben_US
dc.contributor.advisorMatter, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairWalker, David Ben_US
dc.contributor.chairMatter, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2197en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747372en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.