Trailblazers in the Forest: Response of Endangered Mt. Graham Red Squirrels to Severe Insect Infestation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193336
Title:
Trailblazers in the Forest: Response of Endangered Mt. Graham Red Squirrels to Severe Insect Infestation
Author:
Zugmeyer, Claire Ann
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I examined habitat selection of middens within insect-damaged forest and compared home range and survival for Mt. Graham red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis) in insect-damaged and healthy forest. Squirrels used habitat in areas with < 69% tree mortality. Basal area, canopy cover, and log volume were greater at middens than random locations. Within midden sites, only greater basal area of live trees distinguished occupied sites from unoccupied sites. Surface temperature at occupied middens tended to be cooler than unoccupied middens. Squirrels living in insect-damaged forest had larger home ranges than in healthy forest. Squirrel body mass and reproductive condition did not differ between forest types, suggesting that insectdamaged forest provided adequate resources. However, squirrels inhabiting insectdamaged forest experienced lower survivorship and 50% fewer potential reproductive events than squirrels in healthy forest, implicating presence of an ecological trap. Preservation of remaining healthy forest is a priority for management of this endangered species.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Arizona; isolation; habitat selection; ecological trap; survival
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Koprowski, John L.
Committee Chair:
Koprowski, John L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTrailblazers in the Forest: Response of Endangered Mt. Graham Red Squirrels to Severe Insect Infestationen_US
dc.creatorZugmeyer, Claire Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorZugmeyer, Claire Annen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI examined habitat selection of middens within insect-damaged forest and compared home range and survival for Mt. Graham red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus grahamensis) in insect-damaged and healthy forest. Squirrels used habitat in areas with < 69% tree mortality. Basal area, canopy cover, and log volume were greater at middens than random locations. Within midden sites, only greater basal area of live trees distinguished occupied sites from unoccupied sites. Surface temperature at occupied middens tended to be cooler than unoccupied middens. Squirrels living in insect-damaged forest had larger home ranges than in healthy forest. Squirrel body mass and reproductive condition did not differ between forest types, suggesting that insectdamaged forest provided adequate resources. However, squirrels inhabiting insectdamaged forest experienced lower survivorship and 50% fewer potential reproductive events than squirrels in healthy forest, implicating presence of an ecological trap. Preservation of remaining healthy forest is a priority for management of this endangered species.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectisolationen_US
dc.subjecthabitat selectionen_US
dc.subjectecological trapen_US
dc.subjectsurvivalen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKoprowski, John L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairKoprowski, John L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2191en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747367en_US
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