Partitioning of Evapotranspiration in a Chihuahuan Desert Grassland

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193334
Title:
Partitioning of Evapotranspiration in a Chihuahuan Desert Grassland
Author:
Green, Kristin
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent invasions of woody plants into semiarid grasslands are a world-wide phenomena with potential ramifications for global-scale carbon cycling. An understanding of how biological and non-biological processes within ecosystems influence water loss to the atmosphere is important to evaluating the consequences of woody plant encroachment on carbon and water cycling in semiarid lands. Accordingly, evapotranspiration in a Chihuahuan Desert grassland was partitioned into its component fluxes for the 2005 summer growing season using a combination of microlysimeters, to quantify soil evaporation, and eddy covariance, to quantify evapotranspiration and net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE). While some of the results of this study (e.g., the ratio of T to ET) are expected to be highly dependent on the particular characteristics of the 2005 summer rainy season, many of them reveal a more general picture about the timing and magnitude of the biological and non-biological water and carbon cycling responses for a warm-season semiarid grassland. This will be important for trying to understand what happens to the carbon and water cycling processes as grasslands are invaded by shrubs.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
evapotranspiration; hydrology
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shuttleworth, William James; Scott, Russell L.
Committee Chair:
Shuttleworth, William James; Scott, Russell L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePartitioning of Evapotranspiration in a Chihuahuan Desert Grasslanden_US
dc.creatorGreen, Kristinen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Kristinen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent invasions of woody plants into semiarid grasslands are a world-wide phenomena with potential ramifications for global-scale carbon cycling. An understanding of how biological and non-biological processes within ecosystems influence water loss to the atmosphere is important to evaluating the consequences of woody plant encroachment on carbon and water cycling in semiarid lands. Accordingly, evapotranspiration in a Chihuahuan Desert grassland was partitioned into its component fluxes for the 2005 summer growing season using a combination of microlysimeters, to quantify soil evaporation, and eddy covariance, to quantify evapotranspiration and net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE). While some of the results of this study (e.g., the ratio of T to ET) are expected to be highly dependent on the particular characteristics of the 2005 summer rainy season, many of them reveal a more general picture about the timing and magnitude of the biological and non-biological water and carbon cycling responses for a warm-season semiarid grassland. This will be important for trying to understand what happens to the carbon and water cycling processes as grasslands are invaded by shrubs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectevapotranspirationen_US
dc.subjecthydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShuttleworth, William Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.advisorScott, Russell L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairShuttleworth, William Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.chairScott, Russell L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1700en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746366en_US
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