Disenchanting Japan: Japanese Futurity in Neuromancer and the Science Fiction of Masaki Goro

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193331
Title:
Disenchanting Japan: Japanese Futurity in Neuromancer and the Science Fiction of Masaki Goro
Author:
Garza, James Michael
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I apply enchantment theory to William Gibson's Neuromancer and several works by the Japanese SF author Masaki Goro to reveal shared assumptions about Japan as the locus of an emergent techno-social hybridity. Both Gibson and Masaki register signs of widespread disenchantment stemming from an increasingly technologically advanced society with a ruthlessly efficient take on capitalism. However, they mobilize their portrayals to different ends. I demonstrate that the authors diverge in their assessments of a technologically-mediated reenchantment. I also argue that the authors' use of conventions from hard-boiled fiction performs several functions. First, it ironically highlights the impossibility of nostalgia in such a future world, where the concept of home is divested of stability. Second, it evinces an anxiety over the transition from individualistic subjectivity to decentered posthumanity. Third, it reinforces the theme of the supplantation of the traditional nation-state by hyper-capitalist forms.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Disenchantment; Futurity; Gibson; Masaki; Neuromancer; Weber
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
East Asian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gabriel, James P.
Committee Chair:
Gabriel, James P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDisenchanting Japan: Japanese Futurity in Neuromancer and the Science Fiction of Masaki Goroen_US
dc.creatorGarza, James Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarza, James Michaelen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI apply enchantment theory to William Gibson's Neuromancer and several works by the Japanese SF author Masaki Goro to reveal shared assumptions about Japan as the locus of an emergent techno-social hybridity. Both Gibson and Masaki register signs of widespread disenchantment stemming from an increasingly technologically advanced society with a ruthlessly efficient take on capitalism. However, they mobilize their portrayals to different ends. I demonstrate that the authors diverge in their assessments of a technologically-mediated reenchantment. I also argue that the authors' use of conventions from hard-boiled fiction performs several functions. First, it ironically highlights the impossibility of nostalgia in such a future world, where the concept of home is divested of stability. Second, it evinces an anxiety over the transition from individualistic subjectivity to decentered posthumanity. Third, it reinforces the theme of the supplantation of the traditional nation-state by hyper-capitalist forms.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectDisenchantmenten_US
dc.subjectFuturityen_US
dc.subjectGibsonen_US
dc.subjectMasakien_US
dc.subjectNeuromanceren_US
dc.subjectWeberen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEast Asian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGabriel, James P.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGabriel, James P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPinnington, Noel J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcVeigh, Brian J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10842en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753732en_US
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