Bat Diversity, Resource Use and Activity Patterns along a Sonoran Desert Riparian Corridor

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193329
Title:
Bat Diversity, Resource Use and Activity Patterns along a Sonoran Desert Riparian Corridor
Author:
Buecher, Debbie Jane Cramer
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I quantified the bat assemblage associated with a Sonoran Desert riparian corridor at a wildland-urban interface using mist netting (2002-2005) to assess differential spatial and temporal resource use. My capture rate was high (17 species and 961 individuals) considering the aridity of the area; however, landscape complexity of this montane region undoubtedly contributes to foraging opportunities. I found that bats were distributed along the canyon when water was plentiful but their activity was concentrated at isolated pools during dry periods. I also found temporal variation in pool-use by the most frequently captured species. I conducted an acoustic study to measure bat-use between deciduous riparian and Sonoran desertscrub communities. I measured activity levels using number of acoustic call files. I found greater bat foraging in desertscrub and used a multidisciplinary approach to determine why bats might use the more arid environment. All capture data and supporting analyses are included in appendices.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
bats; acoustics; Sonoran Desert; resource partitioning; fire; riparian corridor
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Koprowski, John L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBat Diversity, Resource Use and Activity Patterns along a Sonoran Desert Riparian Corridoren_US
dc.creatorBuecher, Debbie Jane Crameren_US
dc.contributor.authorBuecher, Debbie Jane Crameren_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI quantified the bat assemblage associated with a Sonoran Desert riparian corridor at a wildland-urban interface using mist netting (2002-2005) to assess differential spatial and temporal resource use. My capture rate was high (17 species and 961 individuals) considering the aridity of the area; however, landscape complexity of this montane region undoubtedly contributes to foraging opportunities. I found that bats were distributed along the canyon when water was plentiful but their activity was concentrated at isolated pools during dry periods. I also found temporal variation in pool-use by the most frequently captured species. I conducted an acoustic study to measure bat-use between deciduous riparian and Sonoran desertscrub communities. I measured activity levels using number of acoustic call files. I found greater bat foraging in desertscrub and used a multidisciplinary approach to determine why bats might use the more arid environment. All capture data and supporting analyses are included in appendices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectbatsen_US
dc.subjectacousticsen_US
dc.subjectSonoran Deserten_US
dc.subjectresource partitioningen_US
dc.subjectfireen_US
dc.subjectriparian corridoren_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKoprowski, John L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2532en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748437en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.