Sexual Isolation Between Drosophila mojavensis and Drosophila arizonae

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193326
Title:
Sexual Isolation Between Drosophila mojavensis and Drosophila arizonae
Author:
Massie, Katie
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sexual, or behavioral, isolation is a form of reproductive isolation that impedes gene flow between divergent taxa. In this study, sexual isolation was measured in a sister-species pair of North American cactophilic fruitflies. The results show that interspecific behavioral isolation is dependent upon the strain of origin of D. mojavensis, but is independent of the strain of origin of D. arizonae. Interspecific sexual isolation is greatest in crosses involving D. mojavensis from sympatry, which is consistent with reinforcement, and seems to be attributable to increased reluctance by D. mojavensis females and D. arizonae males to mate with heterospecifics. Contrary to previous studies, I found strong evidence for reproductive isolation between two strains of D. arizonae. The majority of the observed behavioral isolation seems to be the result of intraspecific, interpopulation encounters between females from Southeastern Mexico and males derived from the Northern population.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
sexual isolation; sympatry; reinforcement; Drosophila; speciation
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Markow, Therese A.
Committee Chair:
Markow, Therese A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSexual Isolation Between Drosophila mojavensis and Drosophila arizonaeen_US
dc.creatorMassie, Katieen_US
dc.contributor.authorMassie, Katieen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSexual, or behavioral, isolation is a form of reproductive isolation that impedes gene flow between divergent taxa. In this study, sexual isolation was measured in a sister-species pair of North American cactophilic fruitflies. The results show that interspecific behavioral isolation is dependent upon the strain of origin of D. mojavensis, but is independent of the strain of origin of D. arizonae. Interspecific sexual isolation is greatest in crosses involving D. mojavensis from sympatry, which is consistent with reinforcement, and seems to be attributable to increased reluctance by D. mojavensis females and D. arizonae males to mate with heterospecifics. Contrary to previous studies, I found strong evidence for reproductive isolation between two strains of D. arizonae. The majority of the observed behavioral isolation seems to be the result of intraspecific, interpopulation encounters between females from Southeastern Mexico and males derived from the Northern population.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectsexual isolationen_US
dc.subjectsympatryen_US
dc.subjectreinforcementen_US
dc.subjectDrosophilaen_US
dc.subjectspeciationen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology & Evolutionary Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarkow, Therese A.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMarkow, Therese A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPapaj, Danielen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMachado, Carlosen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1629en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356156en_US
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