Heat Deaths Among Undocumented US-Mexico Border Crossers In Pima County Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193325
Title:
Heat Deaths Among Undocumented US-Mexico Border Crossers In Pima County Arizona
Author:
Keim, Samuel M.
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Widespread media reports have described an increase in heat-related deaths among undocumented immigrant border crossers in Southern Arizona in recent years. The factual basis and important risk factors associated with these deaths have not been well studied. Although, the most common cause of heat fatalities is environmental exposure during heat waves, deserts of the southwestern USA are known for temperatures that exceed this threshold for 30 days or more. Heat-related fatalities, however, have been and continue to be rare among residents of the region. Undocumented immigration across the US-Mexico border into Arizona has likely been robust for decades, although accurate measures of the volume are not available due to its covert nature. This thesis research focuses on the occurrence and distribution of heat deaths among undocumented US-Mexico border crossers in Pima County, Arizona. Implications of this work include improving future research, informing public health policy and planning of prevention strategies.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Heat Death; Undocumented Immigrants
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Epidemiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Harris , Robin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleHeat Deaths Among Undocumented US-Mexico Border Crossers In Pima County Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorKeim, Samuel M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKeim, Samuel M.en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWidespread media reports have described an increase in heat-related deaths among undocumented immigrant border crossers in Southern Arizona in recent years. The factual basis and important risk factors associated with these deaths have not been well studied. Although, the most common cause of heat fatalities is environmental exposure during heat waves, deserts of the southwestern USA are known for temperatures that exceed this threshold for 30 days or more. Heat-related fatalities, however, have been and continue to be rare among residents of the region. Undocumented immigration across the US-Mexico border into Arizona has likely been robust for decades, although accurate measures of the volume are not available due to its covert nature. This thesis research focuses on the occurrence and distribution of heat deaths among undocumented US-Mexico border crossers in Pima County, Arizona. Implications of this work include improving future research, informing public health policy and planning of prevention strategies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectHeat Deathen_US
dc.subjectUndocumented Immigrantsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEpidemiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHarris , Robinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosales, Ceciliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSherrill, Duaneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2098en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747329en_US
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