Stream/Aquifer Interactions in a Semi-Arid Effluent Dependent River: A Clogging Conceptual Model

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193317
Title:
Stream/Aquifer Interactions in a Semi-Arid Effluent Dependent River: A Clogging Conceptual Model
Author:
Treese, Samantha
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Treated wastewater (effluent) has been used as a water source for aquifer recharge and sustaining perennial surface water flow. Artificial recharge basins allow effluent to seep into the ground relieving stressed aquifers. However, these basins frequently become clogged due to physical, chemical, and biological processes. Effluent is also used to replace baseflow for dry streambeds. However, little is known about the effect of effluent on stream-aquifer interactions. Effluent from the Nogales International Waste Water Treatment Plant sustains perennial flow in the Upper Santa Cruz River, Arizona. A series of monthly field campaigns were undertaken to understand the impact of effluent on the streambed at 16 different sites along a 30 km river reach. The field campaigns had two foci: physical transformations in the streambed and water source identification using chemical composition. Historic data sets including USGS stream gauging records, NIWTP outfall data, ADWR well transducer data and USGS well chemistry data were also analyzed to provide a larger context for the work. Results indicate that localized clogging forms in the Upper Santa Cruz River. The clogging layers perch the stream and shallow streambed causing a desaturation below the streambed. A clogging cycle is established in the context of a semi-arid hydrologic cycle: formation during dry and hot pre-monsoon months, and removal by a set of large flood flows (10+ m3/sec) during the monsoon season. However, if the intensity of flooding during the semi-arid hydrologic cycle is lessened, the dependent riparian area can experience a die off.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
clogging layer; wastewater effleunt; effluent dependent river; unsaturated streambed; effects of effluent
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Meixner, Thomas
Committee Chair:
Meixner, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleStream/Aquifer Interactions in a Semi-Arid Effluent Dependent River: A Clogging Conceptual Modelen_US
dc.creatorTreese, Samanthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTreese, Samanthaen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTreated wastewater (effluent) has been used as a water source for aquifer recharge and sustaining perennial surface water flow. Artificial recharge basins allow effluent to seep into the ground relieving stressed aquifers. However, these basins frequently become clogged due to physical, chemical, and biological processes. Effluent is also used to replace baseflow for dry streambeds. However, little is known about the effect of effluent on stream-aquifer interactions. Effluent from the Nogales International Waste Water Treatment Plant sustains perennial flow in the Upper Santa Cruz River, Arizona. A series of monthly field campaigns were undertaken to understand the impact of effluent on the streambed at 16 different sites along a 30 km river reach. The field campaigns had two foci: physical transformations in the streambed and water source identification using chemical composition. Historic data sets including USGS stream gauging records, NIWTP outfall data, ADWR well transducer data and USGS well chemistry data were also analyzed to provide a larger context for the work. Results indicate that localized clogging forms in the Upper Santa Cruz River. The clogging layers perch the stream and shallow streambed causing a desaturation below the streambed. A clogging cycle is established in the context of a semi-arid hydrologic cycle: formation during dry and hot pre-monsoon months, and removal by a set of large flood flows (10+ m3/sec) during the monsoon season. However, if the intensity of flooding during the semi-arid hydrologic cycle is lessened, the dependent riparian area can experience a die off.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectclogging layeren_US
dc.subjectwastewater effleunten_US
dc.subjecteffluent dependent riveren_US
dc.subjectunsaturated streambeden_US
dc.subjecteffects of effluenten_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMeixner, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.chairMeixner, Thomasen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2762en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749513en_US
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