Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193309
Title:
Locating the Resiliency & Survivance in the Cherokee Phoenix
Author:
Ross-Mulkey, Mikhelle Lynn
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis is a content analysis of the first phase of Cherokee Phoenix, the first American Indian newspaper started during a time of turmoil--the era of Removal. The Cherokee Phoenix began publication in New Echota, Cherokee Nation on February 21, 1828 with Elias Boudinot as the first editor. Its last publication in this location was on May 31, 1834. The paper was re-enlivened later as the Cherokee Advocate and again as the Cherokee Phoenix. This paper was meant to be printed weekly (on Thursdays), but this did not always happen. A content analysis looking for themes of `assimilation,' endurance, `survivance,' resiliency, struggle, adaptation, and `peoplehood' was undertaken. The goal was to `re-write' the history that already exists about the Cherokee Phoenix and Cherokee people, by proposing and providing evidential support for a more complex and messy explanation as to why the Cherokee Phoenix started and continued to be published.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
American Indian; Cherokee Phoenix; culture; newspapers; resiliency; survivance
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
American Indian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Luna-Firebaugh, Eileen

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleLocating the Resiliency & Survivance in the Cherokee Phoenixen_US
dc.creatorRoss-Mulkey, Mikhelle Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss-Mulkey, Mikhelle Lynnen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a content analysis of the first phase of Cherokee Phoenix, the first American Indian newspaper started during a time of turmoil--the era of Removal. The Cherokee Phoenix began publication in New Echota, Cherokee Nation on February 21, 1828 with Elias Boudinot as the first editor. Its last publication in this location was on May 31, 1834. The paper was re-enlivened later as the Cherokee Advocate and again as the Cherokee Phoenix. This paper was meant to be printed weekly (on Thursdays), but this did not always happen. A content analysis looking for themes of `assimilation,' endurance, `survivance,' resiliency, struggle, adaptation, and `peoplehood' was undertaken. The goal was to `re-write' the history that already exists about the Cherokee Phoenix and Cherokee people, by proposing and providing evidential support for a more complex and messy explanation as to why the Cherokee Phoenix started and continued to be published.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen_US
dc.subjectCherokee Phoenixen_US
dc.subjectcultureen_US
dc.subjectnewspapersen_US
dc.subjectresiliencyen_US
dc.subjectsurvivanceen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLuna-Firebaugh, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTippeconnic Fox, Mary Joen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOberly, Staceyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11026en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754979en_US
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