Arsenic in Arizona: Assessing the Economic Cost and Hydrogeologic Feasibility of Nontreatment Options

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193305
Title:
Arsenic in Arizona: Assessing the Economic Cost and Hydrogeologic Feasibility of Nontreatment Options
Author:
Davis, Jacob
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently issued a new MaximumContaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water. The new MCL lowers theacceptable level of arsenic in drinking water from 50 parts per billion to 10 parts perbillion. Treatment technologies for arsenic removal are expensive to operate.Nontreatment options pose an alternative to treatment. Nontreatment is allowed undergovernment regulation. However, such options are limited by local hydrogeologicconditions. Many areas in Arizona have favorable conditions. Estimates for the capitalcosts for several nontreatment options were collected through surveys. In a comparison ofthe capital costs of nontreatment options to treatment, nontreatment was less than half thecost of treatment. Operating costs for nontreatment are also expected to be several timessmaller than for treatment. A comparison using annualized costs shows that nontreatmentcosts less than one fifth of treatment.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
arsenic nontreatment; arsenic; drinking water
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bradley, Michael D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleArsenic in Arizona: Assessing the Economic Cost and Hydrogeologic Feasibility of Nontreatment Optionsen_US
dc.creatorDavis, Jacoben_US
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Jacoben_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe United States Environmental Protection Agency recently issued a new MaximumContaminant Level (MCL) for arsenic in drinking water. The new MCL lowers theacceptable level of arsenic in drinking water from 50 parts per billion to 10 parts perbillion. Treatment technologies for arsenic removal are expensive to operate.Nontreatment options pose an alternative to treatment. Nontreatment is allowed undergovernment regulation. However, such options are limited by local hydrogeologicconditions. Many areas in Arizona have favorable conditions. Estimates for the capitalcosts for several nontreatment options were collected through surveys. In a comparison ofthe capital costs of nontreatment options to treatment, nontreatment was less than half thecost of treatment. Operating costs for nontreatment are also expected to be several timessmaller than for treatment. A comparison using annualized costs shows that nontreatmentcosts less than one fifth of treatment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectarsenic nontreatmenten_US
dc.subjectarsenicen_US
dc.subjectdrinking wateren_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBradley, Michael D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStewart, S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMeixner, T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHogan, J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1239en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137354547en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.