The Comparative Effectiveness of Teaching Beat Detection through Movement and Singing among Kindergarten Students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193302
Title:
The Comparative Effectiveness of Teaching Beat Detection through Movement and Singing among Kindergarten Students
Author:
Nolan, Karin
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine if beat detection and beat competency (i.e. maintaining a steady beat) could be more effectively taught through movement, singing, or a combination of the two. Subjects (N =102) were kindergarten students from an elementary school in the Southwest. Students completed a pretest and posttest to assess beat detection ability; the test measured their ability to tap a steady beat with and without music. Subjects received instruction in one of three methods for a six-week period: singing, movement, or a combination of the two. Data analysis results revealed a significant (p < .05) difference between the pretest and the posttest scores for all three groups; subjects appeared to show progress in the ability to detect and maintain a beat with all three instructional methods. There was no significant difference, however, in the progress between the groups; each method of instruction yielded similar improvement.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
beat; detection; movement; singing; music; education
Degree Name:
MM
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cooper, Shelly C
Committee Chair:
Cooper, Shelly C

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleThe Comparative Effectiveness of Teaching Beat Detection through Movement and Singing among Kindergarten Studentsen_US
dc.creatorNolan, Karinen_US
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Karinen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine if beat detection and beat competency (i.e. maintaining a steady beat) could be more effectively taught through movement, singing, or a combination of the two. Subjects (N =102) were kindergarten students from an elementary school in the Southwest. Students completed a pretest and posttest to assess beat detection ability; the test measured their ability to tap a steady beat with and without music. Subjects received instruction in one of three methods for a six-week period: singing, movement, or a combination of the two. Data analysis results revealed a significant (p < .05) difference between the pretest and the posttest scores for all three groups; subjects appeared to show progress in the ability to detect and maintain a beat with all three instructional methods. There was no significant difference, however, in the progress between the groups; each method of instruction yielded similar improvement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectbeaten_US
dc.subjectdetectionen_US
dc.subjectmovementen_US
dc.subjectsingingen_US
dc.subjectmusicen_US
dc.subjecteducationen_US
thesis.degree.nameMMen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCooper, Shelly Cen_US
dc.contributor.chairCooper, Shelly Cen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2025en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747322en_US
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