Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193299
Title:
Sensory Gardens for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Author:
Wilson, Beverly Jean
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One of every 166 children born today could be diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (CDC 2006). Growing bodies of evidence show sensory integration issues may be at the root of many of the symptoms children with ASD exhibit. Sensory integration is defined as the ability to feel, understand, and organize sensory information from the body and environment. The issues surrounding sensory integration are reflected in both hypersensitive and hyposensitive reactions by children with ASD to the vestibular, proprioception, visual, audio, tactile, and olfactory senses.The goal of this paper is to address the sensory integration issues of children with ASD by creating a sensory garden which would allow them to focus on therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. By using the principles and elements of design, guidelines for this garden focused on producing calming effects for hyper reactive children with ASD and stimulating effects for hypo reactions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
sensory gardens; healing gardens; autism spectrum disorder; sensory integrative dysfuntion; multisensory environment
Degree Name:
MLA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Landscape Architecture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Johnson, Lauri M
Committee Chair:
Johnson, Lauri M

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSensory Gardens for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorderen_US
dc.creatorWilson, Beverly Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Beverly Jeanen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne of every 166 children born today could be diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (CDC 2006). Growing bodies of evidence show sensory integration issues may be at the root of many of the symptoms children with ASD exhibit. Sensory integration is defined as the ability to feel, understand, and organize sensory information from the body and environment. The issues surrounding sensory integration are reflected in both hypersensitive and hyposensitive reactions by children with ASD to the vestibular, proprioception, visual, audio, tactile, and olfactory senses.The goal of this paper is to address the sensory integration issues of children with ASD by creating a sensory garden which would allow them to focus on therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. By using the principles and elements of design, guidelines for this garden focused on producing calming effects for hyper reactive children with ASD and stimulating effects for hypo reactions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectsensory gardensen_US
dc.subjecthealing gardensen_US
dc.subjectautism spectrum disorderen_US
dc.subjectsensory integrative dysfuntionen_US
dc.subjectmultisensory environmenten_US
thesis.degree.nameMLAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLandscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Lauri Men_US
dc.contributor.chairJohnson, Lauri Men_US
dc.identifier.proquest1877en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746434en_US
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