Social Differentiation in Animal Use and Subsistence: A Case Study of the Marana Platform Mound

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193298
Title:
Social Differentiation in Animal Use and Subsistence: A Case Study of the Marana Platform Mound
Author:
Blythe, Ashley Anne
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Marana Platform Mound Community (AZ AA:12:251[ASM]) in the Tucson Basin of southern Arizona provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanisms of social organization within an early Classic Period Hohokam community. The role of the platform mound for integrative communal ritual or segregated elite-controlled activity is examined through faunal remains from the platform mound and nearby residential localities. Taxonomic diversity, relative abundance, and element distribution are used to measure the extent to which the platform mound served to integrate or distinguish site residents. Subtle differences in the diversity of taxa, the quantity of deposited faunal remains, and the quality of portions and taxa are indicative of differential access to resources between residents at the Platform Mound and residents in sites further away in the Tucson Basin. The findings support the current hypothesis that a dual mode of network and corporate strategy was used to organize the community.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Faunal Studies; Hohokam; Marana Platform Mound; Zooarchaeology
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet
Committee Chair:
Pavao-Zuckerman, Barnet

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleSocial Differentiation in Animal Use and Subsistence: A Case Study of the Marana Platform Mounden_US
dc.creatorBlythe, Ashley Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBlythe, Ashley Anneen_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Marana Platform Mound Community (AZ AA:12:251[ASM]) in the Tucson Basin of southern Arizona provides a unique opportunity to examine the mechanisms of social organization within an early Classic Period Hohokam community. The role of the platform mound for integrative communal ritual or segregated elite-controlled activity is examined through faunal remains from the platform mound and nearby residential localities. Taxonomic diversity, relative abundance, and element distribution are used to measure the extent to which the platform mound served to integrate or distinguish site residents. Subtle differences in the diversity of taxa, the quantity of deposited faunal remains, and the quality of portions and taxa are indicative of differential access to resources between residents at the Platform Mound and residents in sites further away in the Tucson Basin. The findings support the current hypothesis that a dual mode of network and corporate strategy was used to organize the community.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectFaunal Studiesen_US
dc.subjectHohokamen_US
dc.subjectMarana Platform Mounden_US
dc.subjectZooarchaeologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPavao-Zuckerman, Barneten_US
dc.contributor.chairPavao-Zuckerman, Barneten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFish, Paulen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFish, Suzanneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10468en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659752173en_US
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