Beyond the Shatt al-Arab: How the Fall of Saddam Hussein Changed Iran-Iraq Relations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193287
Title:
Beyond the Shatt al-Arab: How the Fall of Saddam Hussein Changed Iran-Iraq Relations
Author:
Rousu, David A.
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003 is the one of the most important events in the history of Iran-Iraq relations. Prior to the US-led invasion, Iran and Iraq were by no means friends and fought each other bitterly for eight years in the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s. The enmity continued throughout the following decade, as Iran and Iraq developed intimate relationships with each others' dissidents and exiles. When Coalition forces finally toppled Saddam Hussein's government on April 9, 2003, the slate was cleared for Shi'ites and Kurds to assume power for the first time in Iraq's 80 year history. For leadership in the new Iraq, Shi'ites and Kurds turned to the organizations that struggled against the Ba'athists. Thus, Iran's Iraqi allies were able to fill Baghdad's power vacuum through elections and, at times, by force. As a result of regime change, Iran-Iraq relations have improved considerably. Despite some clear progress though, several contentious issues still remain.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Iran; Iraq; Kurd; relations; Saddam; Shi'ite
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Smith, Charles D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleBeyond the Shatt al-Arab: How the Fall of Saddam Hussein Changed Iran-Iraq Relationsen_US
dc.creatorRousu, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRousu, David A.en_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003 is the one of the most important events in the history of Iran-Iraq relations. Prior to the US-led invasion, Iran and Iraq were by no means friends and fought each other bitterly for eight years in the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s. The enmity continued throughout the following decade, as Iran and Iraq developed intimate relationships with each others' dissidents and exiles. When Coalition forces finally toppled Saddam Hussein's government on April 9, 2003, the slate was cleared for Shi'ites and Kurds to assume power for the first time in Iraq's 80 year history. For leadership in the new Iraq, Shi'ites and Kurds turned to the organizations that struggled against the Ba'athists. Thus, Iran's Iraqi allies were able to fill Baghdad's power vacuum through elections and, at times, by force. As a result of regime change, Iran-Iraq relations have improved considerably. Despite some clear progress though, several contentious issues still remain.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectIranen_US
dc.subjectIraqen_US
dc.subjectKurden_US
dc.subjectrelationsen_US
dc.subjectSaddamen_US
dc.subjectShi'iteen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSmith, Charles D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDunford, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11058en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659754998en_US
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