Effects of Economic Restructuring on Household Commodity Production in the Louisiana Shrimp Fishery

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193285
Title:
Effects of Economic Restructuring on Household Commodity Production in the Louisiana Shrimp Fishery
Author:
Marks, Brian J
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Louisiana shrimp fishery has experienced a collapse in the price of shrimp since 2001. The principal reason for this collapse is increasing shrimp imports. Examining the political economy of agro-food systems and the interrelated household economies of Louisiana shrimp fisherpeople, this thesis asks how household commodity production, where fishers own their means of production and supply most labor themselves, is being restructured by the liberalization of seafood trade. Shrimpers have drawn increasingly on household resources (such as unwaged labor of family members) that are normally devoted to social reproduction to maintain their participation in household commodity production. In other words, households shift resources out of the family and into the economy in order to make good on losses of cash income they suffer from low prices. Households continue producing at de facto wage levels below that necessary to support the household on shrimping income alone.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Household economies; fisheries; Louisiana; globalization
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Geography; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marston, Sallie
Committee Chair:
Marston, Sallie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleEffects of Economic Restructuring on Household Commodity Production in the Louisiana Shrimp Fisheryen_US
dc.creatorMarks, Brian Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarks, Brian Jen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Louisiana shrimp fishery has experienced a collapse in the price of shrimp since 2001. The principal reason for this collapse is increasing shrimp imports. Examining the political economy of agro-food systems and the interrelated household economies of Louisiana shrimp fisherpeople, this thesis asks how household commodity production, where fishers own their means of production and supply most labor themselves, is being restructured by the liberalization of seafood trade. Shrimpers have drawn increasingly on household resources (such as unwaged labor of family members) that are normally devoted to social reproduction to maintain their participation in household commodity production. In other words, households shift resources out of the family and into the economy in order to make good on losses of cash income they suffer from low prices. Households continue producing at de facto wage levels below that necessary to support the household on shrimping income alone.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectHousehold economiesen_US
dc.subjectfisheriesen_US
dc.subjectLouisianaen_US
dc.subjectglobalizationen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarston, Sallieen_US
dc.contributor.chairMarston, Sallieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1426en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137355595en_US
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