Dancing Modernity: Gender, Sexuality and the State in the Late Ottoman Empire and Early Turkish Republic

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193284
Title:
Dancing Modernity: Gender, Sexuality and the State in the Late Ottoman Empire and Early Turkish Republic
Author:
van Dobben, Danielle J.
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Early Ottoman dance practices that took place in gender segregated spaces andallowed for a certain degree of sexual explicitness and expressions of homoerotic desirewere disavowed among Turkish elites in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. "Bellydance" became associated with non-Turkish performers, while the Tanzimat and YoungTurk state employed the theater to perform emerging ideas about 'Turkishness' and the'New Woman.' In the early Turkish Republic, the new cadre of Kemalist militaryofficers and bureaucrats altogether rejected its Ottoman heritage and danced the waltz ina close embrace to the music of Western orchestras.This thesis charts significant changes in dance practices between the late OttomanEmpire and early Turkish Republic in order to examine the articulation of modern viewsof gender and sexuality. Dance played a formative role in shaping Turkish modernityand framed moral issues about gender, sexuality, and public space, reflecting andreshaping social life at the same time.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
dance; Turkey; modernity; gender; sexuality; public space
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hudson, Leila
Committee Chair:
Hudson, Leila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDancing Modernity: Gender, Sexuality and the State in the Late Ottoman Empire and Early Turkish Republicen_US
dc.creatorvan Dobben, Danielle J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorvan Dobben, Danielle J.en_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEarly Ottoman dance practices that took place in gender segregated spaces andallowed for a certain degree of sexual explicitness and expressions of homoerotic desirewere disavowed among Turkish elites in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. "Bellydance" became associated with non-Turkish performers, while the Tanzimat and YoungTurk state employed the theater to perform emerging ideas about 'Turkishness' and the'New Woman.' In the early Turkish Republic, the new cadre of Kemalist militaryofficers and bureaucrats altogether rejected its Ottoman heritage and danced the waltz ina close embrace to the music of Western orchestras.This thesis charts significant changes in dance practices between the late OttomanEmpire and early Turkish Republic in order to examine the articulation of modern viewsof gender and sexuality. Dance played a formative role in shaping Turkish modernityand framed moral issues about gender, sexuality, and public space, reflecting andreshaping social life at the same time.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectdanceen_US
dc.subjectTurkeyen_US
dc.subjectmodernityen_US
dc.subjectgenderen_US
dc.subjectsexualityen_US
dc.subjectpublic spaceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2907en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659750555en_US
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