False Facial Recognition: The Relationship Between False Alarms and Frontal Lobe Functioning in Older Adults

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193283
Title:
False Facial Recognition: The Relationship Between False Alarms and Frontal Lobe Functioning in Older Adults
Author:
Recknor, Emily Charlotte
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous research has shown that older adults are more susceptible to false facial recognition than younger adults, possibly related to changes in the frontal cortices. We hypothesized that false recognition would be related to poorer performance on measures of memory monitoring, decision-making, and "frontal" functioning. Forty-one older adults, classified as high or low frontal based on standard neuropsychological measures, completed a face recognition memory task, a Feeling of Knowing (FOK) task, and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). There was a correlation between false alarm rates and response bias on the recognition memory test with bias on the FOK task. High false-alarmers had a liberal response bias and were overconfident in their memory predictions relative to low false-alarmers. Performance did not relate to standard neuropsychological tests, potentially due to their sensitivity to dorsolateral prefrontal functioning, while the FOK task and the IGT are related to ventromedial prefrontal functioning.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.
Committee Chair:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleFalse Facial Recognition: The Relationship Between False Alarms and Frontal Lobe Functioning in Older Adultsen_US
dc.creatorRecknor, Emily Charlotteen_US
dc.contributor.authorRecknor, Emily Charlotteen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPrevious research has shown that older adults are more susceptible to false facial recognition than younger adults, possibly related to changes in the frontal cortices. We hypothesized that false recognition would be related to poorer performance on measures of memory monitoring, decision-making, and "frontal" functioning. Forty-one older adults, classified as high or low frontal based on standard neuropsychological measures, completed a face recognition memory task, a Feeling of Knowing (FOK) task, and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). There was a correlation between false alarm rates and response bias on the recognition memory test with bias on the FOK task. High false-alarmers had a liberal response bias and were overconfident in their memory predictions relative to low false-alarmers. Performance did not relate to standard neuropsychological tests, potentially due to their sensitivity to dorsolateral prefrontal functioning, while the FOK task and the IGT are related to ventromedial prefrontal functioning.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.contributor.chairKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest2520en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748427en_US
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