Its No Secret at All: Extra Economic and Exogenous Development and Change in the Interwar Egyptian Economy, 1919-1939

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193276
Title:
Its No Secret at All: Extra Economic and Exogenous Development and Change in the Interwar Egyptian Economy, 1919-1939
Author:
Murphy, Evan Roger
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The development of the interwar Egyptian economy resulted from interactions between extra-economic and exogenous factors, normally seen as lying outside the economic sphere in historical accounts. Local economic elites successfully challenged colonial domination of the local economy by utilizing a number of strategies to found locally controlled businesses. The strategy of economic nationalism allowed the local elite to break into the foreign dominated Egyptian economy. By 1927 this strategy was adjusted to facilitate partnerships with foreign firms who sought out partners due to the exigencies of the Great Depression. Foreign powers interested in Egypt began to see colonial control as a detriment to their continued influence in Egypt following their increased economic success in the country. Along with strategic factors this would bring about the diminution of the capitulations in 1937 in favor of bi-lateral trade arrangements.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Near Eastern Studies
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Smith, Charles D.
Committee Chair:
Smith, Charles D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleIts No Secret at All: Extra Economic and Exogenous Development and Change in the Interwar Egyptian Economy, 1919-1939en_US
dc.creatorMurphy, Evan Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Evan Rogeren_US
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe development of the interwar Egyptian economy resulted from interactions between extra-economic and exogenous factors, normally seen as lying outside the economic sphere in historical accounts. Local economic elites successfully challenged colonial domination of the local economy by utilizing a number of strategies to found locally controlled businesses. The strategy of economic nationalism allowed the local elite to break into the foreign dominated Egyptian economy. By 1927 this strategy was adjusted to facilitate partnerships with foreign firms who sought out partners due to the exigencies of the Great Depression. Foreign powers interested in Egypt began to see colonial control as a detriment to their continued influence in Egypt following their increased economic success in the country. Along with strategic factors this would bring about the diminution of the capitulations in 1937 in favor of bi-lateral trade arrangements.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Charles D.en_US
dc.contributor.chairSmith, Charles D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGibbs, David N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest10644en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659753383en_US
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