Domain-Sensitive Tuning of Relational Generalization in the First Year of Life

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193275
Title:
Domain-Sensitive Tuning of Relational Generalization in the First Year of Life
Author:
Dawson, Colin Graham
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two age groups of infants were tested for their ability to learn an AAB or ABA repetition generalization in sequences of musical chords. The 4-month-olds, but not the 7.5-month-olds, successfully learned the generalization. Another group of 7.5-month-old infants successfully learned a generalization across melodies that all ended on a particular scale degree, even though the key of the melodies was varied. A survey of a musical corpus of children's songs reveals that AAB and ABA patterns do not occur more frequently than chance, while phrases frequently end on particular scale degrees. Together, these findings suggest that infants learn to constrain the set of generalizations they consider in order to favor those that rely upon features of the input that have proved reliable in their previous experience, specifically experience with a particular input domain. This raises the possibility that experience may play a significant role in parsing infants' environments into domains.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
learning; domain-specificity; generalization; music cognition; language acquisition; attentional tuning
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gerken, LouAnn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleDomain-Sensitive Tuning of Relational Generalization in the First Year of Lifeen_US
dc.creatorDawson, Colin Grahamen_US
dc.contributor.authorDawson, Colin Grahamen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo age groups of infants were tested for their ability to learn an AAB or ABA repetition generalization in sequences of musical chords. The 4-month-olds, but not the 7.5-month-olds, successfully learned the generalization. Another group of 7.5-month-old infants successfully learned a generalization across melodies that all ended on a particular scale degree, even though the key of the melodies was varied. A survey of a musical corpus of children's songs reveals that AAB and ABA patterns do not occur more frequently than chance, while phrases frequently end on particular scale degrees. Together, these findings suggest that infants learn to constrain the set of generalizations they consider in order to favor those that rely upon features of the input that have proved reliable in their previous experience, specifically experience with a particular input domain. This raises the possibility that experience may play a significant role in parsing infants' environments into domains.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectlearningen_US
dc.subjectdomain-specificityen_US
dc.subjectgeneralizationen_US
dc.subjectmusic cognitionen_US
dc.subjectlanguage acquisitionen_US
dc.subjectattentional tuningen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGerken, LouAnnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2447en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659748367en_US
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