Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193272
Title:
Les Anges dans la Litterature Francaise au Cours des Ages
Author:
Fambrough, Melinda Ann
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This "memoire" explores angels in French literature from medieval through post-modern times. A belief in "bird-men" was prevalent in societies of Europe and Asia Minor since the dawn of history. During the Middle Ages, tales about the lives of saints were popular, as was the cult of Saint Michael the Archangel. With the Renaissance came contempt among French writers for legislated spirituality. Francois Rabelais' demons demonstrate this rebellious spirit in Gargantua and Pantagruel. Apologist Blaise Pascal seeks to defend Catholicism with its angels through his Pensees. During the 18th century, Voltaire argues in his Dictionnaire philosophique that angels are inventions of a needy, naive, human imagination. Such romantics as Alfred de Vigny and Victor Hugo write about their sympathy for the devil. Honore de Balzac extols their sentimental quality. Today, Regis Debray proposes that angels fulfill a human need for hierarchy tied to transmission of all cultural heritages.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
French Literature
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
French; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Le Hir, Marie-Pierre
Committee Chair:
Le Hir, Marie-Pierre

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoFRen_US
dc.titleLes Anges dans la Litterature Francaise au Cours des Agesen_US
dc.creatorFambrough, Melinda Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorFambrough, Melinda Annen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis "memoire" explores angels in French literature from medieval through post-modern times. A belief in "bird-men" was prevalent in societies of Europe and Asia Minor since the dawn of history. During the Middle Ages, tales about the lives of saints were popular, as was the cult of Saint Michael the Archangel. With the Renaissance came contempt among French writers for legislated spirituality. Francois Rabelais' demons demonstrate this rebellious spirit in Gargantua and Pantagruel. Apologist Blaise Pascal seeks to defend Catholicism with its angels through his Pensees. During the 18th century, Voltaire argues in his Dictionnaire philosophique that angels are inventions of a needy, naive, human imagination. Such romantics as Alfred de Vigny and Victor Hugo write about their sympathy for the devil. Honore de Balzac extols their sentimental quality. Today, Regis Debray proposes that angels fulfill a human need for hierarchy tied to transmission of all cultural heritages.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectFrench Literatureen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFrenchen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLe Hir, Marie-Pierreen_US
dc.contributor.chairLe Hir, Marie-Pierreen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2017en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752259901en_US
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