An Integrative Approach to Interpretations of an Historical-Period Apache Scout Camp at Fort Apache, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193260
Title:
An Integrative Approach to Interpretations of an Historical-Period Apache Scout Camp at Fort Apache, Arizona
Author:
Laluk, Nicholas
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With the encroachment of the United States military onto Apache lands many Apache men joined the military due to intolerable reservation conditions and the unique economic opportunity of enlisting as scouts for the military. This thesis attempts to better understand the relationships among military personnel, Apache scouts, and nonmilitary Apache people. By examining the material remains of a scout camp located on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), and integrating these findings with oral history and information collected from White Mountain Apache consultants, a better understanding of historical Western Apache life can be delineated. This thesis examines these lifeways and interactions by applying a theoretical framework adopted from Steven Silliman's practical politics, Richard White's concept of the middle ground, and Western Apache landscape knowledge and stories.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Apache; Scout; Practical Politics
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mills, Barbara J.
Committee Chair:
Mills, Barbara J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleAn Integrative Approach to Interpretations of an Historical-Period Apache Scout Camp at Fort Apache, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorLaluk, Nicholasen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaluk, Nicholasen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith the encroachment of the United States military onto Apache lands many Apache men joined the military due to intolerable reservation conditions and the unique economic opportunity of enlisting as scouts for the military. This thesis attempts to better understand the relationships among military personnel, Apache scouts, and nonmilitary Apache people. By examining the material remains of a scout camp located on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), and integrating these findings with oral history and information collected from White Mountain Apache consultants, a better understanding of historical Western Apache life can be delineated. This thesis examines these lifeways and interactions by applying a theoretical framework adopted from Steven Silliman's practical politics, Richard White's concept of the middle ground, and Western Apache landscape knowledge and stories.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectApacheen_US
dc.subjectScouten_US
dc.subjectPractical Politicsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMills, Barbara J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairMills, Barbara J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1987en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659746579en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.