Indigenous Cooperatives, Corporations, and the State on Brazil's Extractive Frontier: Contemporary and Historical Globalizations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193258
Title:
Indigenous Cooperatives, Corporations, and the State on Brazil's Extractive Frontier: Contemporary and Historical Globalizations
Author:
Burke, Brian J
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The AmazonCoop--a cooperative that mediates trade between Brazilian Amazonian indigenous groups and the transnational cosmetics firm The Body Shop--seeks to use the market opportunities provided by neoliberal economic globalization to achieve sustainable development in indigenous villages, with mixed results. While the cooperative provides significant material benefits, it fails to achieve the social goals of democracy, participation, and self-development embodied in the cooperative principles. In this paper, I examine AmazonCoop in the context of historical globalizations on Brazil's "extractive frontier," demonstrating substantial continuity between contemporary and historical political economies. I use this historical anthropological analysis to discuss the potential contributions of cooperatives to development, the relationships between historical and contemporary globalizations, and the political-economic landscapes on which indigenous people can pursue their interests.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Brazil; indigenous; cooperative; development; globalization; fair trade
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Vasquez-Leon, Marcela

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleIndigenous Cooperatives, Corporations, and the State on Brazil's Extractive Frontier: Contemporary and Historical Globalizationsen_US
dc.creatorBurke, Brian Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Brian Jen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe AmazonCoop--a cooperative that mediates trade between Brazilian Amazonian indigenous groups and the transnational cosmetics firm The Body Shop--seeks to use the market opportunities provided by neoliberal economic globalization to achieve sustainable development in indigenous villages, with mixed results. While the cooperative provides significant material benefits, it fails to achieve the social goals of democracy, participation, and self-development embodied in the cooperative principles. In this paper, I examine AmazonCoop in the context of historical globalizations on Brazil's "extractive frontier," demonstrating substantial continuity between contemporary and historical political economies. I use this historical anthropological analysis to discuss the potential contributions of cooperatives to development, the relationships between historical and contemporary globalizations, and the political-economic landscapes on which indigenous people can pursue their interests.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectBrazilen_US
dc.subjectindigenousen_US
dc.subjectcooperativeen_US
dc.subjectdevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectglobalizationen_US
dc.subjectfair tradeen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVasquez-Leon, Marcelaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1632en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356623en_US
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