Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193253
Title:
"Someone, Anyone": Contemporary Theatre's Empathetic Villain
Author:
Marino, Kelli Rae
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Over the course of theatre's history, villains had stereotypical traits: revenge, greed, and power. Contemporary villains, though, evoke more empathy and sympathy from audiences than classic villains. In an effort to understand the roots of villainous behavior in contemporary characters, this thesis surveys a few notable classic villains to help compare the classic to the contemporary. While holding on to qualities of the classic stereotypes, contemporary playwrights create frequent moments of sympathy and empathy for villains who appeal to audiences' desires to connect, justify, and understand the reasons for their villainies. This thesis investigates despicable yet empathetic villains in three plays: Tony Kushner's Angels in America, Martin McDonagh's The Beauty Queen of Leenane, and Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman's Assassins. An analysis of the playwrights' manipulation of characters and traits, as well as audience expectations, provides a theory on the new villain type and the lessons that can be learned.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Villain; Sympathy and Empathy; Contemporary Theatre; Kushner; McDonagh; Sondheim and Weidman
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Theatre Arts; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dickey, Jerry
Committee Chair:
Dickey, Jerry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.title"Someone, Anyone": Contemporary Theatre's Empathetic Villainen_US
dc.creatorMarino, Kelli Raeen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarino, Kelli Raeen_US
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOver the course of theatre's history, villains had stereotypical traits: revenge, greed, and power. Contemporary villains, though, evoke more empathy and sympathy from audiences than classic villains. In an effort to understand the roots of villainous behavior in contemporary characters, this thesis surveys a few notable classic villains to help compare the classic to the contemporary. While holding on to qualities of the classic stereotypes, contemporary playwrights create frequent moments of sympathy and empathy for villains who appeal to audiences' desires to connect, justify, and understand the reasons for their villainies. This thesis investigates despicable yet empathetic villains in three plays: Tony Kushner's Angels in America, Martin McDonagh's The Beauty Queen of Leenane, and Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman's Assassins. An analysis of the playwrights' manipulation of characters and traits, as well as audience expectations, provides a theory on the new villain type and the lessons that can be learned.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectVillainen_US
dc.subjectSympathy and Empathyen_US
dc.subjectContemporary Theatreen_US
dc.subjectKushneren_US
dc.subjectMcDonaghen_US
dc.subjectSondheim and Weidmanen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre Artsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDickey, Jerryen_US
dc.contributor.chairDickey, Jerryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2745en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659749775en_US
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