Chasing a Dream: The Formulation of American Identity in the Plays of Edward Albee

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193250
Title:
Chasing a Dream: The Formulation of American Identity in the Plays of Edward Albee
Author:
Kittredge, James
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Edward Albee's late-career plays contain realistic characters who struggle to create identities for themselves in an America still clinging to misbegotten cultural ideals of the 1950s (e.g. power, money, the "perfect" family). This thesis seeks to give these relatively unexamined later plays the attention they deserve. Therein, Albee's conception of the American Dream is defined through an analysis of essays on post-World War II American domestic social attitudes. The playwright's biography is also examined. I then discuss Albee's stylistic and thematic groundwork by way of criticism of several early plays (The Zoo Story, The American Dream, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?), followed by original textual analysis of three later plays (Three Tall Women, The Play About the Baby, The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?) in an attempt to uncover how Albee's comment on American cultural mythology has changed since the beginning of his career.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Edward Albee; dramaturgy; criticism; twentieth century american drama
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Theatre Arts; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Dickey, Jerry

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleChasing a Dream: The Formulation of American Identity in the Plays of Edward Albeeen_US
dc.creatorKittredge, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorKittredge, Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEdward Albee's late-career plays contain realistic characters who struggle to create identities for themselves in an America still clinging to misbegotten cultural ideals of the 1950s (e.g. power, money, the "perfect" family). This thesis seeks to give these relatively unexamined later plays the attention they deserve. Therein, Albee's conception of the American Dream is defined through an analysis of essays on post-World War II American domestic social attitudes. The playwright's biography is also examined. I then discuss Albee's stylistic and thematic groundwork by way of criticism of several early plays (The Zoo Story, The American Dream, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?), followed by original textual analysis of three later plays (Three Tall Women, The Play About the Baby, The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?) in an attempt to uncover how Albee's comment on American cultural mythology has changed since the beginning of his career.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectEdward Albeeen_US
dc.subjectdramaturgyen_US
dc.subjectcriticismen_US
dc.subjecttwentieth century american dramaen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTheatre Artsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDickey, Jerryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1638en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356706en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.