Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193239
Title:
Private Armies and Personal Power in the Late Roman Empire
Author:
Wilkinson, Ryan
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis' case studies examine the critical roles played by personal power and private armies in the late Roman empire. Chapter 1 examines alleged military corruption in fourth-century C.E. north Africa, arguing that the imperial government's power under the Dominate was diffused among competing interest groups within Roman society, whose interests were not always conducive to the security of the empire as a whole. Chapter 2 argues that bandit-ridden Isauria in Asia Minor was apparently successfully integrated into the imperial system, yet relied heavily on local personal power to control its violence-prone population. Chapter 3 argues that Roman pursuit of private or factional power sealed Rome's loss of the Gallic provinces in the fifth century. Together, these three case studies argue that the later Roman empire was significantly influenced by internal divisions and private power, which were just as important as foreign, 'barbarian' influences in determining the empire's fate.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
History
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Futrell, Alison

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titlePrivate Armies and Personal Power in the Late Roman Empireen_US
dc.creatorWilkinson, Ryanen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Ryanen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis' case studies examine the critical roles played by personal power and private armies in the late Roman empire. Chapter 1 examines alleged military corruption in fourth-century C.E. north Africa, arguing that the imperial government's power under the Dominate was diffused among competing interest groups within Roman society, whose interests were not always conducive to the security of the empire as a whole. Chapter 2 argues that bandit-ridden Isauria in Asia Minor was apparently successfully integrated into the imperial system, yet relied heavily on local personal power to control its violence-prone population. Chapter 3 argues that Roman pursuit of private or factional power sealed Rome's loss of the Gallic provinces in the fifth century. Together, these three case studies argue that the later Roman empire was significantly influenced by internal divisions and private power, which were just as important as foreign, 'barbarian' influences in determining the empire's fate.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFutrell, Alisonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnstone, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoberts, Walteren_US
dc.identifier.proquest2230en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747397en_US
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