Going Against the Flow: Middle Class Families and Neoliberalism in Nogales, Sonora

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193238
Title:
Going Against the Flow: Middle Class Families and Neoliberalism in Nogales, Sonora
Author:
Stone, Joanna
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Following decades of protectionism, in 1982 Mexico reacted to its foreign debt crisis by implementing extreme structural adjustment policies and it has continued a pattern of neoliberalism, increasingly opening its economy to international markets. The cumulative impacts of these policies have negatively affected the majority of the Mexican population, and researchers have documented the detrimental effects of neoliberal polices on working and middle classes in other contexts. Based on ethnographic research in Nogales, Sonora, this paper will describe a particular group of Mexicans who have nevertheless risen to middle class status throughout this time period. It will situate them within an industrializing border economy and will investigate some of the factors, both internal and external, that have contributed to their success in this endeavor. Finally, it will raise questions for future research, such as: Is this middle-class sustainable?
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Middle class; Mexico; Neoliberal; Maquila; Social mobility; History
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Green, Linda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleGoing Against the Flow: Middle Class Families and Neoliberalism in Nogales, Sonoraen_US
dc.creatorStone, Joannaen_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, Joannaen_US
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFollowing decades of protectionism, in 1982 Mexico reacted to its foreign debt crisis by implementing extreme structural adjustment policies and it has continued a pattern of neoliberalism, increasingly opening its economy to international markets. The cumulative impacts of these policies have negatively affected the majority of the Mexican population, and researchers have documented the detrimental effects of neoliberal polices on working and middle classes in other contexts. Based on ethnographic research in Nogales, Sonora, this paper will describe a particular group of Mexicans who have nevertheless risen to middle class status throughout this time period. It will situate them within an industrializing border economy and will investigate some of the factors, both internal and external, that have contributed to their success in this endeavor. Finally, it will raise questions for future research, such as: Is this middle-class sustainable?en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectMiddle classen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.subjectNeoliberalen_US
dc.subjectMaquilaen_US
dc.subjectSocial mobilityen_US
dc.subjectHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGreen, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAustin, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWoronov, Terryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1641en_US
dc.identifier.oclc137356202en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.