Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Resilience of the Southern Paiute High Chief System

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193234
Title:
Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Resilience of the Southern Paiute High Chief System
Author:
Van Vlack, Kathleen Ann
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Southern Paiutes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau have a deep connection to their environment. Since Creation, Southern Paiutes maintain that it is their duty to manage their environment to promote growth and sustainability within their ecosystem. They have developed numerous strategies and activities that have been integrated into their cultural system that increases biodiversity and biocomplexity throughout their homeland. The Southern Paiutes had a traditional leadership system that was responsible for the maintenance of social and ecological order throughout the Southern Paiute nation. The Southern Paiute leadership, more commonly referred to as the High Chiefs, was a multi-layered system that functioned on national, regional, and local levels. This essay examines the roles and functions the High Chiefs had traditionally in Southern Paiute culture and how it was used to maintain the Southern Paiute way of life and their environment.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Southern Paiute; Resilience; Hierarchy
Degree Name:
MA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
American Indian Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Stoffle, Richard W
Committee Chair:
Stoffle, Richard W

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoENen_US
dc.titleTraditional Ecological Knowledge and Resilience of the Southern Paiute High Chief Systemen_US
dc.creatorVan Vlack, Kathleen Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Vlack, Kathleen Annen_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSouthern Paiutes of the Great Basin and Colorado Plateau have a deep connection to their environment. Since Creation, Southern Paiutes maintain that it is their duty to manage their environment to promote growth and sustainability within their ecosystem. They have developed numerous strategies and activities that have been integrated into their cultural system that increases biodiversity and biocomplexity throughout their homeland. The Southern Paiutes had a traditional leadership system that was responsible for the maintenance of social and ecological order throughout the Southern Paiute nation. The Southern Paiute leadership, more commonly referred to as the High Chiefs, was a multi-layered system that functioned on national, regional, and local levels. This essay examines the roles and functions the High Chiefs had traditionally in Southern Paiute culture and how it was used to maintain the Southern Paiute way of life and their environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectSouthern Paiuteen_US
dc.subjectResilienceen_US
dc.subjectHierarchyen_US
thesis.degree.nameMAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStoffle, Richard Wen_US
dc.contributor.chairStoffle, Richard Wen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParezo, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolm, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSekaquaptewa, Emoryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest2185en_US
dc.identifier.oclc659747363en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.