The Gendered Effects of Violence: War, Women's Health and Experience in Iraq

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/193231
Title:
The Gendered Effects of Violence: War, Women's Health and Experience in Iraq
Author:
Brand, Tamara Diane Drenttel
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The violence stemming from the occupation and civil war between 2003 and 2008 in Iraq redefined the oppression and suffering of Iraqi women, disrupting and shifting their social and familial roles, while also making them vulnerable as targets in the civil conflict. This thesis demonstrates the complexity of motive and aim to the violence committed against Iraqi women and argues that the effects of that violence were far more wide reaching and layered than simply the impact of the violent act itself. Because of this, the effects of violence go beyond the battlefield and affect women in the most intimate way possible - their lives, their health and that of their children. By analyzing how violence has intruded upon and shaped the daily reality of Iraqi women one is able to better understand the gendered experience of conflict and violence in Iraq and its responsibility for the deterioration of Iraqi women's health and well-being.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
Health; Iraq; Violence; War; Women
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Near Eastern Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Hudson, Leila

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Gendered Effects of Violence: War, Women's Health and Experience in Iraqen_US
dc.creatorBrand, Tamara Diane Drenttelen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrand, Tamara Diane Drenttelen_US
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe violence stemming from the occupation and civil war between 2003 and 2008 in Iraq redefined the oppression and suffering of Iraqi women, disrupting and shifting their social and familial roles, while also making them vulnerable as targets in the civil conflict. This thesis demonstrates the complexity of motive and aim to the violence committed against Iraqi women and argues that the effects of that violence were far more wide reaching and layered than simply the impact of the violent act itself. Because of this, the effects of violence go beyond the battlefield and affect women in the most intimate way possible - their lives, their health and that of their children. By analyzing how violence has intruded upon and shaped the daily reality of Iraqi women one is able to better understand the gendered experience of conflict and violence in Iraq and its responsibility for the deterioration of Iraqi women's health and well-being.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
dc.subjectHealthen_US
dc.subjectIraqen_US
dc.subjectViolenceen_US
dc.subjectWaren_US
dc.subjectWomenen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHudson, Leilaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetteridge, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Charles Cen_US
dc.identifier.proquest11396en_US
dc.identifier.oclc752261264en_US
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