Kenyan Language Ideologies, Language Endangerment, and Gikuyu (Kikuyu): How Discourses of Nationalism, Education, and Development Have Placed a Large, Indigenous Language at Risk

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192949
Title:
Kenyan Language Ideologies, Language Endangerment, and Gikuyu (Kikuyu): How Discourses of Nationalism, Education, and Development Have Placed a Large, Indigenous Language at Risk
Author:
Orcutt-Gachiri, Heidi Ann
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation, based on pilot research in the U.S. and Kenya in 2002 and fieldwork in two secondary schools in Kenya in 2004, has a twofold focus. First, it examines language ideologies of English, Kiswahili, and Kenya's 53 indigenous languages, in particular Gikuyu [Kikuyu], in the context of Kenyan discourses of nationalism, education, and development. Second, it shows how these language ideologies are contributing to the language endangerment of Kenya's indigenous languages.The stable trilingualism enjoyed by the parents of today's young Kenyans is not shared by their children. The research question that drove this dissertation was, Why are trilingual parents raising bilingual children? This dissertation seeks to answer that question by drawing on ethnographic observations, consultant interviews, and newspaper data from Kenya's largest newspapers, the Nation and the Standard. Rapid language shift, occurring in just the past 20 years in Kenya, has put even large languages like Gikuyu into an endangered status. A historically contextualized understanding of the reasons behind the shift is necessary in order for the trend to be reversed.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Gikuyu (Kikuyu); Indigenous language endangerment; Kenyan language ideologies; Language and tribalism; Multilingualism in Kenya; Sheng
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology & Linguistics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hill, Jane H.; Zepeda, Ofelia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleKenyan Language Ideologies, Language Endangerment, and Gikuyu (Kikuyu): How Discourses of Nationalism, Education, and Development Have Placed a Large, Indigenous Language at Risken_US
dc.creatorOrcutt-Gachiri, Heidi Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorOrcutt-Gachiri, Heidi Annen_US
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation, based on pilot research in the U.S. and Kenya in 2002 and fieldwork in two secondary schools in Kenya in 2004, has a twofold focus. First, it examines language ideologies of English, Kiswahili, and Kenya's 53 indigenous languages, in particular Gikuyu [Kikuyu], in the context of Kenyan discourses of nationalism, education, and development. Second, it shows how these language ideologies are contributing to the language endangerment of Kenya's indigenous languages.The stable trilingualism enjoyed by the parents of today's young Kenyans is not shared by their children. The research question that drove this dissertation was, Why are trilingual parents raising bilingual children? This dissertation seeks to answer that question by drawing on ethnographic observations, consultant interviews, and newspaper data from Kenya's largest newspapers, the Nation and the Standard. Rapid language shift, occurring in just the past 20 years in Kenya, has put even large languages like Gikuyu into an endangered status. A historically contextualized understanding of the reasons behind the shift is necessary in order for the trend to be reversed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen_US
dc.subjectGikuyu (Kikuyu)en_US
dc.subjectIndigenous language endangermenten_US
dc.subjectKenyan language ideologiesen_US
dc.subjectLanguage and tribalismen_US
dc.subjectMultilingualism in Kenyaen_US
dc.subjectShengen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology & Linguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHill, Jane H.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorZepeda, Ofeliaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMendoza-Denton, Norma C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPhilips, Susan U.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilmore, Perryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest10613-
dc.identifier.oclc659752380-
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