Fire history in riparian canyon pine-oak forests and the intervening desert grasslands of the southwest borderlands : a dendroecological, historical, and cultural inquiry.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192108
Title:
Fire history in riparian canyon pine-oak forests and the intervening desert grasslands of the southwest borderlands : a dendroecological, historical, and cultural inquiry.
Author:
Kaib, J. Mark,1963-
Issue Date:
1998
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Dendroecological, documentary, and ethnoecological evidence were combined to provide an integrated understanding of past natural and cultural fires in the Southwest Borderlands. Fire frequency for the desert grasslands was inferred from synchronous intercanyon fire events. Mean fire intervals range between 4-8 years in canyon pine-oak forests, 4-9 years in the intervening desert grasslands, and 5-9 years in the mixed-conifer forests. Riparian canyon pine-oak forests were important corridors for fire spread between the desert grasslands and higher-elevation forests. The decline of postsettlement (>1870s) fires typical of most forests in U.S., is not evident south of the border in Mexico. Documentary evidence reveals the Apache had detailed knowledge offre, that burning practices were controlled and limited, and ecosystem enhancement through intentional burning was not suggested. However, the common exception was burning practiced during wartime periods, principally by the Apache but also by the Spanish, Mexicans, and later Americans. Fire reconstructions indicate that wartime-period fires were significantly more frequent than peacetime periods at several canyon-rancheria sites.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Watershed management -- Arizona.; Riparian areas -- United States.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFire history in riparian canyon pine-oak forests and the intervening desert grasslands of the southwest borderlands : a dendroecological, historical, and cultural inquiry.en_US
dc.creatorKaib, J. Mark,1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKaib, J. Mark,1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDendroecological, documentary, and ethnoecological evidence were combined to provide an integrated understanding of past natural and cultural fires in the Southwest Borderlands. Fire frequency for the desert grasslands was inferred from synchronous intercanyon fire events. Mean fire intervals range between 4-8 years in canyon pine-oak forests, 4-9 years in the intervening desert grasslands, and 5-9 years in the mixed-conifer forests. Riparian canyon pine-oak forests were important corridors for fire spread between the desert grasslands and higher-elevation forests. The decline of postsettlement (>1870s) fires typical of most forests in U.S., is not evident south of the border in Mexico. Documentary evidence reveals the Apache had detailed knowledge offre, that burning practices were controlled and limited, and ecosystem enhancement through intentional burning was not suggested. However, the common exception was burning practiced during wartime periods, principally by the Apache but also by the Spanish, Mexicans, and later Americans. Fire reconstructions indicate that wartime-period fires were significantly more frequent than peacetime periods at several canyon-rancheria sites.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWatershed management -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRiparian areas -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSwetnam, Thomas W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZwolinski, Malcolm J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBetancourt, Julioen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213866104en_US
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