Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192100
Title:
The Occurrence of microsporidia in environmental waters
Author:
Kamper, Matthew Frederic.
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Seven species in the phylum Microspora infect humans; four predominantly those patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The number of documented infections in immunocompetent persons grows annually. Microsporidia are obligate, intracellular parasites that produce environmentally resistant spores. These spores are shed in feces and urine, making waterborne transmission possible. This work reports occurrence data for human infectious microsporidia species in environmental waters. Polypropylene-fiber cartridge filters (1DPPPY) of a nominal porosity of 1 micron (um) along with a modified Information Collection Rule protocol were used in the collection, elution, sample concentration, flotation, and analysis of surface water, groundwater, and wastewater samples. Fluorescently labeled, Encephalitozoon species-specific polyclonal antibodies were used to detect presumptive spores present in 46 samples. Overall, 12 samples were positive: 4 groundwater, 2 surface water, and 6 wastewater.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Microsporidia.; Water -- Analysis.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soil, Water, and Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gerba, Charles P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Occurrence of microsporidia in environmental watersen_US
dc.creatorKamper, Matthew Frederic.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKamper, Matthew Frederic.en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSeven species in the phylum Microspora infect humans; four predominantly those patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The number of documented infections in immunocompetent persons grows annually. Microsporidia are obligate, intracellular parasites that produce environmentally resistant spores. These spores are shed in feces and urine, making waterborne transmission possible. This work reports occurrence data for human infectious microsporidia species in environmental waters. Polypropylene-fiber cartridge filters (1DPPPY) of a nominal porosity of 1 micron (um) along with a modified Information Collection Rule protocol were used in the collection, elution, sample concentration, flotation, and analysis of surface water, groundwater, and wastewater samples. Fluorescently labeled, Encephalitozoon species-specific polyclonal antibodies were used to detect presumptive spores present in 46 samples. Overall, 12 samples were positive: 4 groundwater, 2 surface water, and 6 wastewater.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMicrosporidia.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater -- Analysis.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water, and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPepper, Ianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFrye, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.oclc226059745en_US
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