Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192099
Title:
Regional estimates of evapotranspiration from irrigated alfalfa
Author:
Konrad, Sara L.
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study applied a simple empirical evaporation model (SWET) proposed by Osmolski (1985) to estimate evapotranspiration over alfalfa using only solar radiation and wind data. SVVET was used to inventory evapotranspiration from irrigated alfalfa in lowland deserts in the southern half of Arizona. Meteorological data were obtained from the Arizona Meteorological Network (AZMET) for 21 sites in key agricultural regions. The number of years at each site ranged from 10 to 3 making possible for the first time the expression of long term means and standard deviations of alfalfa evapotranspiration. Results from SWET are compared to values of Penman reference evapotranspiration produced by AZMET and to estimates derived from the Blaney-Criddle and Thornthwaite methods. Temporal variability of daily estimates is examined as the scale lengthens from days to years. The spatial variability of predicted evapotranspiration is small across the width of southern Arizona, as illustrated by contour plots of evapotranspiration.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Alfalfa -- Drought intolerance.; Evapotranspiration.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRegional estimates of evapotranspiration from irrigated alfalfaen_US
dc.creatorKonrad, Sara L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKonrad, Sara L.en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study applied a simple empirical evaporation model (SWET) proposed by Osmolski (1985) to estimate evapotranspiration over alfalfa using only solar radiation and wind data. SVVET was used to inventory evapotranspiration from irrigated alfalfa in lowland deserts in the southern half of Arizona. Meteorological data were obtained from the Arizona Meteorological Network (AZMET) for 21 sites in key agricultural regions. The number of years at each site ranged from 10 to 3 making possible for the first time the expression of long term means and standard deviations of alfalfa evapotranspiration. Results from SWET are compared to values of Penman reference evapotranspiration produced by AZMET and to estimates derived from the Blaney-Criddle and Thornthwaite methods. Temporal variability of daily estimates is examined as the scale lengthens from days to years. The spatial variability of predicted evapotranspiration is small across the width of southern Arizona, as illustrated by contour plots of evapotranspiration.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAlfalfa -- Drought intolerance.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEvapotranspiration.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGay, Lloyd W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLopes, Vicente L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYitayew, Mulunehen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213466886en_US
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