Field Investigation of the Mittry Lake Bass (Micropterous Salmoides) Fishery Including : Water Quality, Community Structure, Habitat Selection, and spinal Injury Rates Associated With Electrofishing

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192097
Title:
Field Investigation of the Mittry Lake Bass (Micropterous Salmoides) Fishery Including : Water Quality, Community Structure, Habitat Selection, and spinal Injury Rates Associated With Electrofishing
Author:
Schleusner, Clifford James
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The water quality parameters measured were not limiting available habitat nor contributing as a stressor inhibiting growth of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in Mittry Lake, Yuma County, Arizona. The decline in the general condition of the largemouth bass fishery appears to have resulted when artificially high growth rates and condition factors caused by unusual flow conditions and exceptionally large amounts of nutrients or forage began to return to normal. The data from Mittry Lake supports the fact that largemouth bass are habitat and forage generalists. Largemouth bass successfully exploited all types of conditions within the lake. Movement of largemouth bass in Mittry Lake suggests the existence of sedentary and mobile segments of the population. It appears unlikely that electrofishing causes the same incidence and severity of injuries to largemouth bass as it does to salmonids. MI of the hemorrhages and spinal damage found in electrofished largemouth bass were minor.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Renewable Natural Resources & Wildlife and Fisheries Science
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Maughan, O. Eugene

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleField Investigation of the Mittry Lake Bass (Micropterous Salmoides) Fishery Including : Water Quality, Community Structure, Habitat Selection, and spinal Injury Rates Associated With Electrofishingen_US
dc.creatorSchleusner, Clifford Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchleusner, Clifford Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe water quality parameters measured were not limiting available habitat nor contributing as a stressor inhibiting growth of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) in Mittry Lake, Yuma County, Arizona. The decline in the general condition of the largemouth bass fishery appears to have resulted when artificially high growth rates and condition factors caused by unusual flow conditions and exceptionally large amounts of nutrients or forage began to return to normal. The data from Mittry Lake supports the fact that largemouth bass are habitat and forage generalists. Largemouth bass successfully exploited all types of conditions within the lake. Movement of largemouth bass in Mittry Lake suggests the existence of sedentary and mobile segments of the population. It appears unlikely that electrofishing causes the same incidence and severity of injuries to largemouth bass as it does to salmonids. MI of the hemorrhages and spinal damage found in electrofished largemouth bass were minor.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshRenewable Natural Resources & Wildlife and Fisheries Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaughan, O. Eugeneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMaughan, O. Eugeneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatter, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcIvor, Caroleen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213466732en_US
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