Growth responses of giant sequoia to fire and climate in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192084
Title:
Growth responses of giant sequoia to fire and climate in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California
Author:
Mutch, Linda Susan.
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I investigated the radial growth responses of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) to fire in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Mean ring-width indices were used to compare growth between burned and unburned sites and between four different levels of fire severity. Mean growth increased in all sites in the postburn periods relative to pre-burn periods. Favorable climatic conditions contributed to these growth increases. Post-fire mean growth for four out of seven burn sites, however, was significantly higher than that on unburned sites. In general, lower severity fire resulted in lower magnitude growth increases than those observed after moderate to higher severity fire. Very high severity fire that caused extensive foliage damage resulted in post-burn growth suppressions. Post-fire growth increases occurred whether post-burn years were wet or dry. Fire effects on site conditions may moderate climatic impacts on sequoia growth. Giant sequoia seedling establishment was favored by a combination of high severity fire and wet post-burn conditions.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Giant sequoia -- California -- Growth.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Swetnam, Thomas W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGrowth responses of giant sequoia to fire and climate in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, Californiaen_US
dc.creatorMutch, Linda Susan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMutch, Linda Susan.en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI investigated the radial growth responses of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) to fire in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks. Mean ring-width indices were used to compare growth between burned and unburned sites and between four different levels of fire severity. Mean growth increased in all sites in the postburn periods relative to pre-burn periods. Favorable climatic conditions contributed to these growth increases. Post-fire mean growth for four out of seven burn sites, however, was significantly higher than that on unburned sites. In general, lower severity fire resulted in lower magnitude growth increases than those observed after moderate to higher severity fire. Very high severity fire that caused extensive foliage damage resulted in post-burn growth suppressions. Post-fire growth increases occurred whether post-burn years were wet or dry. Fire effects on site conditions may moderate climatic impacts on sequoia growth. Giant sequoia seedling establishment was favored by a combination of high severity fire and wet post-burn conditions.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGiant sequoia -- California -- Growth.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSwetnam, Thomas W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGraumlich, Lisa J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcPherson, Guy R.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc212852082en_US
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