Effects of pH and hydrophobicity on the transport of viruses and bacteria in saturated media

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192056
Title:
Effects of pH and hydrophobicity on the transport of viruses and bacteria in saturated media
Author:
Kinoshita, Takashi,1958-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Effects of pH and hydrophobicity on attachment-detachment of PRD-1 and MS-2 in three different soils, and Pseudomonas fluorescens P17 and Bacillus subtils TF-32 in 0.5-mm silica beads, were investigated in laboratory-column experiments. Attachment and detachment of hydrophobic virus PRD-1 may be predominantly controlled by hydrophobic interactions in soil media, while those of less-hydrophobic virus MS-2 may be mainly controlled by pH. Bacteria tend to exhibit hydrophobic interactions, since their surface contains hydrophobic substances. Soil media can exhibit strong hydrophobic interactions as well as electrostatic interactions. Parameters for three different transport models were estimated. The equilibrium model fits to the breakthrough curves of MS-2 in Cape-Cod soil resulted in dispersion coefficients similar to those of the conservative tracer (NaCl). The first-order and two-site model parameters indicated non-equilibrium conditions in all cases. Calculations of the two-site model were less stable than the first-order model for these breakthrough curves.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Groundwater -- Microbiology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bales, R. C.; Gerba, C. P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of pH and hydrophobicity on the transport of viruses and bacteria in saturated mediaen_US
dc.creatorKinoshita, Takashi,1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKinoshita, Takashi,1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEffects of pH and hydrophobicity on attachment-detachment of PRD-1 and MS-2 in three different soils, and Pseudomonas fluorescens P17 and Bacillus subtils TF-32 in 0.5-mm silica beads, were investigated in laboratory-column experiments. Attachment and detachment of hydrophobic virus PRD-1 may be predominantly controlled by hydrophobic interactions in soil media, while those of less-hydrophobic virus MS-2 may be mainly controlled by pH. Bacteria tend to exhibit hydrophobic interactions, since their surface contains hydrophobic substances. Soil media can exhibit strong hydrophobic interactions as well as electrostatic interactions. Parameters for three different transport models were estimated. The equilibrium model fits to the breakthrough curves of MS-2 in Cape-Cod soil resulted in dispersion coefficients similar to those of the conservative tracer (NaCl). The first-order and two-site model parameters indicated non-equilibrium conditions in all cases. Calculations of the two-site model were less stable than the first-order model for these breakthrough curves.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Microbiology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBales, R. C.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGerba, C. P.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213468587en_US
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