Hydrology and water resources of Capitol Reef National Park, Utah : with emphasis on the middle Fremont River area

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192054
Title:
Hydrology and water resources of Capitol Reef National Park, Utah : with emphasis on the middle Fremont River area
Author:
Christiana, David.
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The water resources of the Capitol Reef National Park area include the middle Fremont River, other perennial and ephemeral watercourses, isolated springs, tinajas, and lakes fed by precipitation on surrounding plateaus, as well as ground water in alluvial, basalt, and sedimentary aquifers fed by recharge from precipitation and stream channel losses. The difference between streamflows at Bicknell (79.2 million m³/yr) and Caineville (67.8 million m³/yr) can be attributed to evapotranspiration by riparian vegetation and cultivated crops and ground-water recharge, which exceeds 1.5 million m³/yr. Regional ground-water movement is eastward from Thousand Lake Mountain and southward along the Waterpocket Fold. Ground-water quality is generally brackish while surface water is fresh, both degrading east of the Waterpocket Fold due to agricultural uses, evapotranspiration and long aquifer residence times. Along the middle Fremont River agricultural use causes a mean salt load increase of 16,100 metric tons/year, turbidity increases three-fold, and fecal coliforms generally increase.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Watershed management -- Utah -- Capitol Reef National Park.; Hydrology -- Utah -- Capitol Reef National Park.; Hydrogeology -- Utah -- Capitol Reef National Park.; Water quality -- Utah -- Capitol Reef National Park.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Davis, Stanley N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHydrology and water resources of Capitol Reef National Park, Utah : with emphasis on the middle Fremont River areaen_US
dc.creatorChristiana, David.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChristiana, David.en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe water resources of the Capitol Reef National Park area include the middle Fremont River, other perennial and ephemeral watercourses, isolated springs, tinajas, and lakes fed by precipitation on surrounding plateaus, as well as ground water in alluvial, basalt, and sedimentary aquifers fed by recharge from precipitation and stream channel losses. The difference between streamflows at Bicknell (79.2 million m³/yr) and Caineville (67.8 million m³/yr) can be attributed to evapotranspiration by riparian vegetation and cultivated crops and ground-water recharge, which exceeds 1.5 million m³/yr. Regional ground-water movement is eastward from Thousand Lake Mountain and southward along the Waterpocket Fold. Ground-water quality is generally brackish while surface water is fresh, both degrading east of the Waterpocket Fold due to agricultural uses, evapotranspiration and long aquifer residence times. Along the middle Fremont River agricultural use causes a mean salt load increase of 16,100 metric tons/year, turbidity increases three-fold, and fecal coliforms generally increase.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWatershed management -- Utah -- Capitol Reef National Park.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology -- Utah -- Capitol Reef National Park.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrogeology -- Utah -- Capitol Reef National Park.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater quality -- Utah -- Capitol Reef National Park.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDavis, Stanley N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRasmussen, Todd C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBassett, Randy L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHenderson, Norman R.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213332743en_US
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