Modeling colloid transport in saturated porous media : an assessment of the importance of pH and kinetics in virus transport

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192039
Title:
Modeling colloid transport in saturated porous media : an assessment of the importance of pH and kinetics in virus transport
Author:
Hinkle, Stephen,1958-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Virus sorption and transport were investigated in controlled laboratory column experiments. Bacteriophage PRD1 did not sorb to silica beads at pH 7 but sorbed strongly at pH 5.5. Kinetic nonequilibrium prevailed at pH 5.5. Desorption of phage was detected during 27 pore volumes of desorption under steady-state conditions and during 135 pore volumes of desorption under transient conditions. Long tailing in the desorption limbs of the breakthrough curves suggests slow desorption rates. Advection-dispersion modeling of the experimental results with a pseudo-first-order reversible-sorption model provided a means by which to estimate transport parameters. Modeling results suggest that the pseudo-first-order rate coefficient for desorption of PRD1 from silica beads at pH 5.5 lies between 2.5 x 10⁻⁷ s⁻¹ and 6.7 x 10⁻⁶ s⁻¹ . Desorption was strongly pH dependent, and sorbed phage were eluted by raising solution pH. Column effluent concentrations of over fourteen times original input concentrations were measured during desorption at elevated pH, suggesting that significant chemical perturbations can in some instances contribute more to colloid desorption than desorption rates applied over long periods of time in steady-state systems.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Colloids -- Transport properties.; Porous materials -- Fluid dynamics.; Viruses.; Chemical kinetics.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bales, Roger C.; Gerba, Charles P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleModeling colloid transport in saturated porous media : an assessment of the importance of pH and kinetics in virus transporten_US
dc.creatorHinkle, Stephen,1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHinkle, Stephen,1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractVirus sorption and transport were investigated in controlled laboratory column experiments. Bacteriophage PRD1 did not sorb to silica beads at pH 7 but sorbed strongly at pH 5.5. Kinetic nonequilibrium prevailed at pH 5.5. Desorption of phage was detected during 27 pore volumes of desorption under steady-state conditions and during 135 pore volumes of desorption under transient conditions. Long tailing in the desorption limbs of the breakthrough curves suggests slow desorption rates. Advection-dispersion modeling of the experimental results with a pseudo-first-order reversible-sorption model provided a means by which to estimate transport parameters. Modeling results suggest that the pseudo-first-order rate coefficient for desorption of PRD1 from silica beads at pH 5.5 lies between 2.5 x 10⁻⁷ s⁻¹ and 6.7 x 10⁻⁶ s⁻¹ . Desorption was strongly pH dependent, and sorbed phage were eluted by raising solution pH. Column effluent concentrations of over fourteen times original input concentrations were measured during desorption at elevated pH, suggesting that significant chemical perturbations can in some instances contribute more to colloid desorption than desorption rates applied over long periods of time in steady-state systems.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshColloids -- Transport properties.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPorous materials -- Fluid dynamics.en_US
dc.subject.lcshViruses.en_US
dc.subject.lcshChemical kinetics.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBales, Roger C.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGerba, Charles P.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc221689881en_US
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