Effects of three landscape treatments on building microclimates, and energy and water use (MLARCH)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192033
Title:
Effects of three landscape treatments on building microclimates, and energy and water use (MLARCH)
Author:
Livingston, Margaret,1956-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Vegetation near structures may reduce cooling loads in warm desert regions. This study was conducted to measure vegetation effects on warm-season energy use of three structures surrounded by different landscapes: 1) decomposed granite (rock), 2) shrubs and decomposed granite (shade), and 3) a bermudagrass lawn (grass). Surface and air temperatures, relative humidity, cooling energy and irrigation water use were measured. Actual energy use was compared to use predicted by microcomputer program MICROPAS. Vegetation resulted in cooler surfaces on most test dates. The grass treatment had lowest air temperatures for all dates. Grass and shade treatments had higher relative humidity and lower actual and predicted electrical use than the rock treatment. The shade treatment had the lowest predicted electrical use for all dates and lower utility costs (water and electricity) than grass (all dates) and rock treatments (two of three dates). Vegetation adjacent to structures had a significant effect on building energy use.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Urban landscape architecture -- United States.; Landscape architecture -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
McPherson, E. Gregory

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of three landscape treatments on building microclimates, and energy and water use (MLARCH)en_US
dc.creatorLivingston, Margaret,1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLivingston, Margaret,1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractVegetation near structures may reduce cooling loads in warm desert regions. This study was conducted to measure vegetation effects on warm-season energy use of three structures surrounded by different landscapes: 1) decomposed granite (rock), 2) shrubs and decomposed granite (shade), and 3) a bermudagrass lawn (grass). Surface and air temperatures, relative humidity, cooling energy and irrigation water use were measured. Actual energy use was compared to use predicted by microcomputer program MICROPAS. Vegetation resulted in cooler surfaces on most test dates. The grass treatment had lowest air temperatures for all dates. Grass and shade treatments had higher relative humidity and lower actual and predicted electrical use than the rock treatment. The shade treatment had the lowest predicted electrical use for all dates and lower utility costs (water and electricity) than grass (all dates) and rock treatments (two of three dates). Vegetation adjacent to structures had a significant effect on building energy use.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshUrban landscape architecture -- United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLandscape architecture -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMcPherson, E. Gregoryen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213415488en_US
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