Some geomorphic models of flood hazards on distributary flow areas in southern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192032
Title:
Some geomorphic models of flood hazards on distributary flow areas in southern Arizona
Author:
Kemna, Stephen Paul,1963-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) uses a method for evaluating flood hazards on alluvial fans that assumes an equal chance of flooding along a radial arc across the fan surface. In southern Arizona there are distributary flow areas (alluvial fans) that do not conform with FEMA's assumption. Thirty-nine sample sites were chosen from the Basin and Range physiographic province in southern Arizona. These sites were classified into five categories of flood hazard; A, B, C, D, and E. The classification scheme is based on the potential randomness of flooding across each site. A method is proposed for locating the primary diffluence (apex) of a distributary flow area. Texture curve analysis is used to locate distributary flow areas on the piedmont plain. Two alternative methods, topologic analysis and a multiple regression model, are presented for evaluating flood hazards on distributary flow areas in southern Arizona. Only eight of the sample sites studied strictly conformed with FEMA's assumption of an equal probability of flooding along a radial arc across the fan surface. The topologic analysis may be used to determine if the FEMA method is appropriate for a given site. A multiple regression model provides rough predictions of the degree of flood hazard based on morphometric and hydrologic variables.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Floods -- Arizona.; Flood control -- Arizona.; Flood damage prevention -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSome geomorphic models of flood hazards on distributary flow areas in southern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorKemna, Stephen Paul,1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKemna, Stephen Paul,1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) uses a method for evaluating flood hazards on alluvial fans that assumes an equal chance of flooding along a radial arc across the fan surface. In southern Arizona there are distributary flow areas (alluvial fans) that do not conform with FEMA's assumption. Thirty-nine sample sites were chosen from the Basin and Range physiographic province in southern Arizona. These sites were classified into five categories of flood hazard; A, B, C, D, and E. The classification scheme is based on the potential randomness of flooding across each site. A method is proposed for locating the primary diffluence (apex) of a distributary flow area. Texture curve analysis is used to locate distributary flow areas on the piedmont plain. Two alternative methods, topologic analysis and a multiple regression model, are presented for evaluating flood hazards on distributary flow areas in southern Arizona. Only eight of the sample sites studied strictly conformed with FEMA's assumption of an equal probability of flooding along a radial arc across the fan surface. The topologic analysis may be used to determine if the FEMA method is appropriate for a given site. A multiple regression model provides rough predictions of the degree of flood hazard based on morphometric and hydrologic variables.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFloods -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFlood control -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshFlood damage prevention -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.oclc221707119en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.