Opportunities for resolving water allocation conflicts in the San Pedro River Basin of Arizona through improving economic efficiency

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192021
Title:
Opportunities for resolving water allocation conflicts in the San Pedro River Basin of Arizona through improving economic efficiency
Author:
Bazlen, William Robert,1952-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A major center of controversy and litigation in the West today is the issue of Federal reserved water rights for Indian tribes. The Gila River Indian Community has claimed an early priority to all appropriable water in the San Pedro basin. The time, legal expense, and the uncertain outcome of adjudication create incentive for involved parties to reach a negotiated solution to the conflict. An analysis of this conflict reveals much higher economic returns to San Pedro River water in the San Pedro basin than at the Gila River Indian Reservation, due largely to loss of water in transport down river. The existence of divergence of economic returns presents the possibility of negotiating a settlement to the conflict. Negotiation for water rights presumes and is critically dependant upon ability to transfer those rights. Non marketability of Indian water rights maximizes the potential damage to non-Indian water users.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Water rights -- San Pedro River (Mexico and Ariz.); Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Gila River Indian Reservation -- Water rights.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Lord, William B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOpportunities for resolving water allocation conflicts in the San Pedro River Basin of Arizona through improving economic efficiencyen_US
dc.creatorBazlen, William Robert,1952-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBazlen, William Robert,1952-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA major center of controversy and litigation in the West today is the issue of Federal reserved water rights for Indian tribes. The Gila River Indian Community has claimed an early priority to all appropriable water in the San Pedro basin. The time, legal expense, and the uncertain outcome of adjudication create incentive for involved parties to reach a negotiated solution to the conflict. An analysis of this conflict reveals much higher economic returns to San Pedro River water in the San Pedro basin than at the Gila River Indian Reservation, due largely to loss of water in transport down river. The existence of divergence of economic returns presents the possibility of negotiating a settlement to the conflict. Negotiation for water rights presumes and is critically dependant upon ability to transfer those rights. Non marketability of Indian water rights maximizes the potential damage to non-Indian water users.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater rights -- San Pedro River (Mexico and Ariz.)en_US
dc.subject.lcshIndians of North America -- Arizona -- Gila River Indian Reservation -- Water rights.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLord, William B.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213416623en_US
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