Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/192018
Title:
Nitrogen cycling at Emerald Lake watershed, Sequoia National Park
Author:
Noppe, Philip Alan,1959-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An annual nitrogen balance was used to develop a conceptual model of nitrogen cycling at the 120 ha Emerald Lake watershed. Atmospheric loadings of NO₃⁻ (7200 eq) and NH₄⁺ (6800 eq) from snow represent the largest external nitrogen sources. Approximately 75 percent of the annual nitrate mass flux is transported by the first 40 percent of the annual lake inflow. The sum of NO₃⁻ and NH₄⁺ deposited from the atmosphere (21,000 eq) and released by soil mineralization (40,000 eq) exceeds inflow mass flux (8,000 eq). Denitrification (10,000 - 20,000 eq) and plant uptake may account for this difference. NH₄⁺ deposition (10,000 eq) and mineralization release (26,500 eq) are large, but the NH₄⁺ inflow flux is near zero. This difference may be due to nitrification with subsequent denitrification, or plant uptake. Data gaps preclude calculation of an annual overall acidity affect. Nitrification is a potential seasonal source of acidity.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Acid deposition -- California -- Emerald Lake Watershed.; Nitrogen cycle -- California -- Emerald Lake Watershed.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bales, Roger C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNitrogen cycling at Emerald Lake watershed, Sequoia National Parken_US
dc.creatorNoppe, Philip Alan,1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorNoppe, Philip Alan,1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn annual nitrogen balance was used to develop a conceptual model of nitrogen cycling at the 120 ha Emerald Lake watershed. Atmospheric loadings of NO₃⁻ (7200 eq) and NH₄⁺ (6800 eq) from snow represent the largest external nitrogen sources. Approximately 75 percent of the annual nitrate mass flux is transported by the first 40 percent of the annual lake inflow. The sum of NO₃⁻ and NH₄⁺ deposited from the atmosphere (21,000 eq) and released by soil mineralization (40,000 eq) exceeds inflow mass flux (8,000 eq). Denitrification (10,000 - 20,000 eq) and plant uptake may account for this difference. NH₄⁺ deposition (10,000 eq) and mineralization release (26,500 eq) are large, but the NH₄⁺ inflow flux is near zero. This difference may be due to nitrification with subsequent denitrification, or plant uptake. Data gaps preclude calculation of an annual overall acidity affect. Nitrification is a potential seasonal source of acidity.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAcid deposition -- California -- Emerald Lake Watershed.en_US
dc.subject.lcshNitrogen cycle -- California -- Emerald Lake Watershed.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBales, Roger C.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213339901en_US
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