Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191954
Title:
The use of temperature as a ground-water tracer in glacial outwash
Author:
Barlow, Paul M.
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A twenty-four hour, divergent-flow thermal tracer experiment was conducted to determine the usefulness of heat as a ground-water tracer. Bromide was used also in the experiment, as a means of comparing the thermal tracer to a conservative chemical species. Observations of pore-fluid temperature and bromide concentration were made at seven points within 3.1 meters of a partially-penetrating injection well. Results show that temperature may be used effectively in the determination of aquifer heterogeneity and aquifer transport and thermal properties. Aquifer porosity was determined to be between 0.35 to 0.61. Longitudinal mass and thermal dispersivities were computed to have been between 0.012 to 0.124 meters, and apparent thermal conductivities were 3.4 to 25.9 times greater than the bulk thermal conductivity of the aquifer. The high conductivities point to the importance of thermal dispersion to the overall transport of a thermal plume during an injection experiment.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Groundwater tracers.; Groundwater flow -- Measurement.; Groundwater -- Measurement.; Heat -- Transmission.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Davis, Stanley N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe use of temperature as a ground-water tracer in glacial outwashen_US
dc.creatorBarlow, Paul M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarlow, Paul M.en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA twenty-four hour, divergent-flow thermal tracer experiment was conducted to determine the usefulness of heat as a ground-water tracer. Bromide was used also in the experiment, as a means of comparing the thermal tracer to a conservative chemical species. Observations of pore-fluid temperature and bromide concentration were made at seven points within 3.1 meters of a partially-penetrating injection well. Results show that temperature may be used effectively in the determination of aquifer heterogeneity and aquifer transport and thermal properties. Aquifer porosity was determined to be between 0.35 to 0.61. Longitudinal mass and thermal dispersivities were computed to have been between 0.012 to 0.124 meters, and apparent thermal conductivities were 3.4 to 25.9 times greater than the bulk thermal conductivity of the aquifer. The high conductivities point to the importance of thermal dispersion to the overall transport of a thermal plume during an injection experiment.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater tracers.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater flow -- Measurement.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Measurement.en_US
dc.subject.lcshHeat -- Transmission.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDavis, Stanley N.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc222013348en_US
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