Injection/recovery lysimeter technique for unsaturated zone soil-water extraction

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191933
Title:
Injection/recovery lysimeter technique for unsaturated zone soil-water extraction
Author:
Amter, Steven,1956-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Current methods of vacuum lysimetry only allow water samples to be collected from the unsaturated zone in relatively wet soils. This thesis presents the results of computer simulation and field testing of a promising new technique that allows water samples to be collected regardless of antecedent moisture content. Injection of a chemically neutral fluid will increase the moisture content of a relatively dry soil, allowing the collection of a sample that contains soil water diluted in the injection fluid. This can be analyzed to yield qualitative chemical data. Although injection was found to alter soil structure and soil-water chemistry in some instances, the technique can be used in existing lysimeters, without modification, to repeatedly obtain partially representative soil-water samples containing inorganic and organic compounds. Injection lysimetry is best suited to those applications, such as tracer tests and detection of containment leakage, where absolute chemical concentrations are not required.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Soil moisture -- Analysis.; Soil moisture -- Measurement.; Groundwater -- Composition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Evans, Daniel D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleInjection/recovery lysimeter technique for unsaturated zone soil-water extractionen_US
dc.creatorAmter, Steven,1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAmter, Steven,1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCurrent methods of vacuum lysimetry only allow water samples to be collected from the unsaturated zone in relatively wet soils. This thesis presents the results of computer simulation and field testing of a promising new technique that allows water samples to be collected regardless of antecedent moisture content. Injection of a chemically neutral fluid will increase the moisture content of a relatively dry soil, allowing the collection of a sample that contains soil water diluted in the injection fluid. This can be analyzed to yield qualitative chemical data. Although injection was found to alter soil structure and soil-water chemistry in some instances, the technique can be used in existing lysimeters, without modification, to repeatedly obtain partially representative soil-water samples containing inorganic and organic compounds. Injection lysimetry is best suited to those applications, such as tracer tests and detection of containment leakage, where absolute chemical concentrations are not required.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSoil moisture -- Analysis.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSoil moisture -- Measurement.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Composition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairEvans, Daniel D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213340144en_US
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