Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191928
Title:
Desert mule deer water consumption in southcentral Arizona
Author:
Hazam, John Eric,1947-
Issue Date:
1987
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I monitored desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) to determine their drinking frequency and water consumption in the Picacho Mountains in the summer of 1986 when temperatures were ≤46 C. Three radio-collared males consumed water 1 time/24 hours over 10 days. Deer consumed from 1.52 to 6.01 liters/visit (X = 3.70, SE = 0.13, N = 54). Females drank more (X = 4.16, N = 20) than males (X = 3.55, N = 24) during late summer (P < 0.05). To measure water consumption of large, free ranging mammals, I developed a technique using a microflowmeter. Water consumption was measured in 0.01 liter units and measurements were linear for volumes ≥1 liter. Field accuracy was within 1%. I observed nocturnal behavior from 250 m using infrared lights and high magnification lenses with a nightscope. Desert mule deer can be censused in summer based on the frequency that they visit waterholes. The minimum water requirements for a captive female desert mule deer (55 ml/kg⁰•⁸/day) indicate an ability to conserve water.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Mule deer.; Deer -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Krausman, P. R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDesert mule deer water consumption in southcentral Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorHazam, John Eric,1947-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHazam, John Eric,1947-en_US
dc.date.issued1987en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI monitored desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) to determine their drinking frequency and water consumption in the Picacho Mountains in the summer of 1986 when temperatures were ≤46 C. Three radio-collared males consumed water 1 time/24 hours over 10 days. Deer consumed from 1.52 to 6.01 liters/visit (X = 3.70, SE = 0.13, N = 54). Females drank more (X = 4.16, N = 20) than males (X = 3.55, N = 24) during late summer (P < 0.05). To measure water consumption of large, free ranging mammals, I developed a technique using a microflowmeter. Water consumption was measured in 0.01 liter units and measurements were linear for volumes ≥1 liter. Field accuracy was within 1%. I observed nocturnal behavior from 250 m using infrared lights and high magnification lenses with a nightscope. Desert mule deer can be censused in summer based on the frequency that they visit waterholes. The minimum water requirements for a captive female desert mule deer (55 ml/kg⁰•⁸/day) indicate an ability to conserve water.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMule deer.en_US
dc.subject.lcshDeer -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKrausman, P. R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, N. S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMannan, R. W.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213442531en_US
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