Biodegradation of trichloroethylene by bacteria indigenous to a contaminated site

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191915
Title:
Biodegradation of trichloroethylene by bacteria indigenous to a contaminated site
Author:
McClellen, Kristen Lee,1960-
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Bacteria indigenous to a trichloroethylene (ICE) contaminated site were used in a batch-microcosm experiment to determine their ability to grow in the presence of and degrade ICE. At two different initial concentrations of ICE, bacterial populations were able to increase their number by two orders of magnitude. Under the aerobic, oligotrophic conditions of the microcosms, the average ICE disappearance in live microcosms for all samples was 47 percent and 33 percent when the initial concentration was 559 ppb and 6.7 ppm, respectively. No TCE disappearance was observed in blank or killed microcosms. It is believed that bacteria degraded ICE to levels as low as 1-2 percent of the initial concentration. Lag times of 14 and 18 days, were observed for the low- and high-concentration microcosms, respectively. Bacterial population shifts were noted throughout the experiment. None of the volatile chlorinated compounds expected as products of biodegradation were found.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Groundwater -- Pollution.; Groundwater -- Microbiology.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bales, Roger; Buras, Netty

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBiodegradation of trichloroethylene by bacteria indigenous to a contaminated siteen_US
dc.creatorMcClellen, Kristen Lee,1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcClellen, Kristen Lee,1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBacteria indigenous to a trichloroethylene (ICE) contaminated site were used in a batch-microcosm experiment to determine their ability to grow in the presence of and degrade ICE. At two different initial concentrations of ICE, bacterial populations were able to increase their number by two orders of magnitude. Under the aerobic, oligotrophic conditions of the microcosms, the average ICE disappearance in live microcosms for all samples was 47 percent and 33 percent when the initial concentration was 559 ppb and 6.7 ppm, respectively. No TCE disappearance was observed in blank or killed microcosms. It is believed that bacteria degraded ICE to levels as low as 1-2 percent of the initial concentration. Lag times of 14 and 18 days, were observed for the low- and high-concentration microcosms, respectively. Bacterial population shifts were noted throughout the experiment. None of the volatile chlorinated compounds expected as products of biodegradation were found.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Pollution.en_US
dc.subject.lcshGroundwater -- Microbiology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBales, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.chairBuras, Nettyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvans, Daniel D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213416601en_US
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