Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191898
Title:
Soil evaporation and soil thermal regime inside micro-lysimeters
Author:
Aldakheel, Yousef Yacoub,1957-
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis evaluates the basic assumption of an infrared thermometry model to predict bare soil evaporation by infrared thermometry. Field data were obtained from the U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, ARS-USDA at Phoenix, Arizona. Computationally, these field data validated that assumption. Secondly, a field experiment was conducted to study the thermal regime of air-dried soil inside metal and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) microlysimeters. A significant difference in soil heat flux was seen between metal and PVC microlysimeters, while no significant difference was observed between PVC microlysimeters and a reference soil. This study supports the findings from recent studies that inside metal microlysimeters, heat is conducted efficiently downward into the deeper soil depths, leaving the surface cooler than the surrounding soil.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Infrared equipment.; Soils Thermal properties -- Measurement.; Evaporation -- Measurement.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soil and Water Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Matthias, Allan D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSoil evaporation and soil thermal regime inside micro-lysimetersen_US
dc.creatorAldakheel, Yousef Yacoub,1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAldakheel, Yousef Yacoub,1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis evaluates the basic assumption of an infrared thermometry model to predict bare soil evaporation by infrared thermometry. Field data were obtained from the U.S. Water Conservation Laboratory, ARS-USDA at Phoenix, Arizona. Computationally, these field data validated that assumption. Secondly, a field experiment was conducted to study the thermal regime of air-dried soil inside metal and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) microlysimeters. A significant difference in soil heat flux was seen between metal and PVC microlysimeters, while no significant difference was observed between PVC microlysimeters and a reference soil. This study supports the findings from recent studies that inside metal microlysimeters, heat is conducted efficiently downward into the deeper soil depths, leaving the surface cooler than the surrounding soil.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshInfrared equipment.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSoils Thermal properties -- Measurement.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEvaporation -- Measurement.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil and Water Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMatthias, Allan D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213359639en_US
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