Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191893
Title:
Minimizing waterhammer transients in a series pipeline
Author:
Conway, Ann Bowman,1951-
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recently, optimization techniques have been applied to the problem of minimizing pressure transients in a pipeline created by valve operation. One such technique is dynamic programming, and a computer program incorporating the method of characteristics and a dynamic programming scheme has been used to calculate the pressure changes at a valve at the downstream end of a series pipeline and to select a valve operating policy which minimizes those pressure changes. The series pipeline either increases or decreases in diameter at an arbitrary location along the pipeline. The valve closure policy determined by dynamic programming creates less severe transients at the valve than a linear policy. A valve opening policy specified by dynamic programming does not offer significant advantages over a linear policy. The dynamic programming scheme allows convenient manipulation of system characteristics, and the policies selected by dynamic programming promise to be applicable to real systems.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Pipelines -- Hydrodynamics.; Strains and stresses.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Civil Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Contractor, Dinshaw N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMinimizing waterhammer transients in a series pipelineen_US
dc.creatorConway, Ann Bowman,1951-en_US
dc.contributor.authorConway, Ann Bowman,1951-en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecently, optimization techniques have been applied to the problem of minimizing pressure transients in a pipeline created by valve operation. One such technique is dynamic programming, and a computer program incorporating the method of characteristics and a dynamic programming scheme has been used to calculate the pressure changes at a valve at the downstream end of a series pipeline and to select a valve operating policy which minimizes those pressure changes. The series pipeline either increases or decreases in diameter at an arbitrary location along the pipeline. The valve closure policy determined by dynamic programming creates less severe transients at the valve than a linear policy. A valve opening policy specified by dynamic programming does not offer significant advantages over a linear policy. The dynamic programming scheme allows convenient manipulation of system characteristics, and the policies selected by dynamic programming promise to be applicable to real systems.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPipelines -- Hydrodynamics.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStrains and stresses.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairContractor, Dinshaw N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPetersen, M. S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoldberg, J.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213358757en_US
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